2017- 2018 School Year: 7th Grade Math

Dear Students and Parents,

Welcome to Griffin Middle school. My name is Mrs. Anastasia Anuforo. I am certified in all academic areas(math, language arts, science, and social studies) and Special education. Please bookmark this page as this will serve as a good communication tool for this school year. Here, our 7th grade Math standards, classwork, and homework assignments will be updated weekly. Please feel free to email me at [email protected] if you have any questions.

In order to help our students understand and enjoy math, I will be incorporating the following strategies in our daily lessons;

Audio – visuals

Concrete/semi-concrete aids

Models

Graphic organizers

Group projects

Chunking

Hands-on Activities

Higher Order Thinking Strategies (HOTS)

 

GRIFFIN MIDDLE SCHOOL FOUNDATION

 WHO ARE WE?

The Griffin Foundation is a non-profit organization formed for the sole purpose of raising funds beyond those currently provided by the Cobb County School District to fund elements of education such as technology enhancements, supplemental enriched curriculum, student services, additional faculty and capital improvements.

WHAT HAVE WE FUNDED THE PAST 4 YEARS? 

  • WHO ARE WE?The Griffin Foundation is a non-profit organization formed for the sole purpose of raising funds beyond those currently provided by the Cobb County School District to fund elements of education such as technology enhancements, supplemental enriched curriculum, student services, additional faculty and capital improvements.WHAT HAVE WE FUNDED THE PAST 4 YEARS?
    • Awarded over $30,000 in Teacher Grants, providing additional resources and tools in the classrooms, including this past year: iPads & Kindles, Media Cart & books in Learning Commons, tuners and metronomes for Band & Orchestra
    • Repainting/refurbishing of the theater; printers for all computer labs
    • Headphones for all computers; picnic tables in the Memorial Garden
    • Created an annual Legacy Award for two students who have achieved personal growth through perseverance

    WHAT DO WE PLAN TO FUND?

    • Outdoor Learning: a GMS Nature Trail, and refurbishing of Outdoor Classroom
    • Annual Teacher/Classroom Grant program
      •    Continue technology expansion: classroom sets of laptops with cart    •       Capital Campaign: Give 2 Griffin (Fall)    •       Student Lock – In (Winter)    •       Donate to the campaign
      •     •       Volunteer to help with any of our events
      • HOW CAN YOU HELP OR GET INVOLVED?
      •     •       Haunted House (October)
      • HOW DO WE RAISE MONEY?
      •    Sponsorship from your businessIf you would like to make a contribution to the Griffin Foundation, please click the yellow DONATE (Pay Pal) button on our GMS homepage: www.cobbk12.org/griffin/
      •     •       Contact Kim Trumble at [email protected] for more information
  • Repainting/refurbishing of the theater; printers for all computer labs
  • Headphones for all computers; picnic tables in the Memorial Garden
  • Created an annual Legacy Award for two students who have achieved personal growth through perseverance

WHAT DO WE PLAN TO FUND?

  • Outdoor Learning: a GMS Nature Trail, and refurbishing of Outdoor Classroom
  • Annual Teacher/Classroom Grant program
    •    Continue technology expansion: classroom sets of laptops with cart    •       Capital Campaign: Give 2 Griffin (Fall)    •       Student Lock – In (Winter)    •       Donate to the campaign
    •     •       Volunteer to help with any of our events
    • HOW CAN YOU HELP OR GET INVOLVED?
    •     •       Haunted House (October)
    • HOW DO WE RAISE MONEY?
    •    Sponsorship from your businessIf you would like to make a contribution to the Griffin Foundation, please click the yellow DONATE (Pay Pal) button on our GMS homepage: www.cobbk12.org/griffin/
    •     •       Contact Kim Trumble at [email protected] for more information

If you would like to make a contribution to the Griffin Foundation, please click the Pay Pal button on our GMS homepage to access.

 

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 13 – NOVEMBER 17

MCC7.EE.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real‐world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.

MCC7.EE.4b Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form px + q > r or px + q < r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem. For example, as a salesperson, you are paid $50 per week plus $3 per sale. This week you want your pay to be at least $100. Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

Inequalities

-symbols

-vocabulary

-computation

-graphing on number line

-error analysis

-word problems on inequalities

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 30 – NOVEMBER 10

MCC7.EE.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example, a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that “increase by 5%” is the same as “multiply by 1.05.”

MCC7.EE.3 Solve multi‐step real‐life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. Apply properties of operations as strategies to calculate with numbers in any form; convert between forms as appropriate; and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies.

-Error Analysis

-Writing word problems from equations

-Multiplication and Division Equations

-Multi-step equations

-Inequalities

 

 

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 23 – OCTOBER 27

 

MCC7.EE.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

MCC7.EE.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example, a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that “increase by 5%” is the same as “multiply by 1.05.”

Factoring Linear Expressions involving fractions

One Step Equations:

-Addition and Subtraction Equations

-Multiplication and Division Equations

 

 

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 16 – OCTOBER 20

MGSE7.EE.1  Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

MGSE7.EE.2  Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can clarify the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that adding a 5% tax to a total is the same as multiplying the total by 1.05.

Writing areas and perimeters in terms of multiplying and simplifying expressions continued

Factoring Linear Expressions

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 9 – OCTOBER 13

MGSE7.EE.1  Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

MGSE7.EE.2  Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can clarify the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that adding a 5% tax to a total is the same as multiplying the total by 1.05.

MONDAY and TUESDAY

-Commutative, associative properties of operations

-Identity and multiplicative property of zero

WEDNESDAY:

-Evaluating Expressions

THURSDAY and FRIDAY:

-Writing areas and perimeters in terms of multiplying and simplifying expressions

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 2 – OCTOBER 6

MGSE7.EE.1  Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

MGSE7.EE.2  Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can clarify the problem and how the quantities in it are related. For example a + 0.05a = 1.05a means that adding a 5% tax to a total is the same as multiplying the total by 1.05.

MONDAY:

-Pre-assessment on Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities

-Parts of an expression:- term, variable, coefficient, constant.

-Types of expression – algebraic expression and numeric expression

TUESDAY:

-Combining like terms

WEDNESDAY:

-Properties:- Distributive property of operations

THURSDAY:

Today, we had more practice on distributive property and combining like terms

Students took the first Formative on unit 2.

-Order of operations review

FRIDAY:

-Week’s lesson review and quiz

 

 

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 18 – SEPTEMBER 22

MGSE7.NS.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.

MGSE7.NS.2d Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.

MGSE7.NS.3 Solve real‐world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers.

Monday and Tuesday – IOWA Testing

Wednesday and Thursday

-Vocabulary review with examples (fractions, decimals, prime numbers, prime factorization, repeating decimals, terminating decimals)

-Converting fractions to decimals

Friday

-Review and Test

 

 

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 11 – SEPTEMBER 15

Due to inclement weather on Monday and Tuesday, and IOWA testing we will continue with last week’s activities on adding and subtracting fractions.

 

 

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 5 – SEPTEMBER 8

Standards:

MGSE7.NS.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.

MGSE7.NS.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (- 1)(– 1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing realworld contexts.

MGSE7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with nonzero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are integers then – (p/q) = (– p)/q = p/(–q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing realworld contexts.

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY: Students will work on multiplication and division of fractions. This includes simple fractions, mixed numbers, and fractions with exponents

THURSDAY:

Adding fractions

-with common denominators

-with different denominators –  finding the least common denominator.

Use number line to add fractions

FRIDAY:

Subtracting fractions – simple fractions and mixed numbers

Students were not able to get to this due to CogAT testing.

 

 

WEEK OF AUGUST 28 – SEPTEMBER 1

Standards:

MGSE7.NS.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.

MGSE7.NS.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (- 1)(– 1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing realworld contexts.

MGSE7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with nonzero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are integers then – (p/q) = (– p)/q = p/(–q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing realworld contexts.

 

Monday:

Many students are still struggling with subtraction of integers, especially the double negative. So we will revisit this.

We will continue with multiplication of integers including exponents.

Today we had a lot of practice with subtraction of integers. We will continue with multiplying integers on Tuesday.

Tuesday:

We will continue with multiplication of integers including substitution

Division of integers ( students will watch video on this, and compare the rules of multiplication and division)

Today, students worked on multiplying integers(including exponents). We had lots of practice.

Wednesday:

Review and Test

Thursday:

Problem Solving – Real world situations involving addition and subtraction of integers.

Friday:

Problem Solving – Real world situations involving multiplication and division of integers.

Homework:

Page 55 of the math workbook, numbers 24 – 32.

 

 

WEEK OF AUGUST 21 – AUGUST 25

Monday:

Review of Quiz

Students scoring below 80 may retake the test

Tuesday:

Adding Integers

-using T-chart

Wednesday:

Subtracting Integers

-students will watch video on this

-students work with partners to solve subtraction problems on page 30 of the workbook

Wednesday:

Multiplication of Integers

-students watch video on this

-students write notes on rules of multiplication(- x + = -, – x – = +)

Thursday & Friday:

Multiplication and Division of Integers

-students apply same multiplication rules to division of integers

-solve problems on pages 37 and 38 0f the workbook

 

WEEK OF AUGUST 14 – AUGUST 18

Monday:

Adding integers

– using  counters.

-zero pairs/additive inverse

-students add integers using counters (applying zero pairs concept), page 17 of the workbook

Tuesday & Wednesday:

Adding Integers

-using number line

-students use vertical and horizontal number lines to solve addition problems

-Students solve real world problems using number line. For example, increase in temperature from low to high

Thursday:

Review on real numbers, absolute value, number line, and addition of  integers

Friday:

Quiz on adding integers

 

 

WEEK OF AUGUST 7 – AUGUST 11

Monday:

Students take Scholastic Math Inventory (SMI) Test

Tuesday/Wednesday:

Real Numbers

-natural numbers

-whole numbers

-integers

-rational numbers

-irrational numbers

Students use graphic organizer to group these numbers, give similarities and differences between them

Thursday:

Absolute Value

-Students learn the concept of absolute value.

-Students work on page 10 of the math workbook

-Solve problems involving absolute value in terms of real world situations.

Friday:

Number line

-Students graph integers on number line

-students use number line to graph absolute value

 

WEEK OF July 31 – August 4

Monday :

– Welcome Back.

-Getting to know you activities

-Folders and  agenda given out to students. Information included in the folders (clinic forms, performing arts forms, etc.) are to be completed, signed by parents and returned as soon as possible.

Tuesday:

Positive Behavior and Intervention Strategies (PBIS)

-Classroom Procedures

-Rules and Rewards

Math syllabus sent home to be signed and returned next day.

Wednesday:

Positive Behavior and Intervention Strategies (PBIS)

-Hallway procedure

-Cafeteria procedure

 

Thursday:

Positive Behavior and Intervention Strategies (PBIS)

-Restroom procedure

-Mental Math – Multiplication drill/chart

Students get their math workbooks

Friday:

Review of PBIS procedures

Students get division  chart(Drill)

-Students practice coordinate graphing on page 6 of the workbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2016/1017 SCHOOL YEAR; 6th Grade Earth Science.

Week of May 1 – May 12

S8CS1. Students will explore the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a. Understand the importance of – and keep – honest, clear, and accurate records in science

b. Understand that hypotheses can be valuable even if they turn out not to be completely accurate.

Scientific Method:

-Questions

-Observations

-Hypotheses

-Experiments

-Conclusion

 

Week of April 17 – April 28: Review

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration

b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction

c. Demonstrate the effect of simple machines (lever, inclined plane, pulley, wedge, screw, and wheel and axle) on work.

S8P4. Students will explore the wave nature of sound and electromagnetic radiation.

Milestone testing starts 4/19/17

 

Week of April 10 – April 14:  REVIEW

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

a. Distinguish between atoms and molecules.

b. Describe the difference between pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures.(Focus on elements)

c. Describe the movement of particles in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas states.

d. Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of matter as physical (i.e., density, melting point, boiling point) or chemical (i.e., reactivity, combustibility).

e. Distinguish between changes in matter as physical (i.e., physical change) or chemical (development of a gas, formation of precipitate, and change in color).

f. Recognize that there are more than 100 elements and some have similar properties as shown on the Periodic Table of Elements.

g. Identify and demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter.

S8P2. Students will be familiar with the forms and transformations of energy.

a. Explain energy transformation in terms of the Law of Conservation of Energy

b. Explain the relationship between potential and kinetic energy.

c. Compare and contrast the different forms of energy (heat, light, electricity, mechanical motion, and sound) and their characteristics.

 

 

Week of March 27 – March 31

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

b. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

Circuits:

-Parts – load, conductors, energy source, switch

-Types – series circuits, parallel circuits

-Compare and contrast series and parallel circuits

-Students will build circuit of their choice

UNIT VOCABULARY:

Resistance – opposition presented to the current by a material or device

series circuit – circuit in which the parts are joined one after another such that the current in each part is the same

parallel circuit – circuit in which the parts are joined in branches so that the potential difference across each part is the same

magnetic field – space near a magnet where a magnetic force acts on objects

magnetic field lines

electromagnetism – interaction between electricity and magnetism

electromagnet – coil with a soft iron core that acts as a magnet while an electric current is in the coil

 

 

 

Week of March 13 – March 24

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

b. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

c. Investigate and explain that electric currents and magnets can exert force on each other.

Magnets:

-magnetic force

-magnetic field

-electricity and magnetism

-magnetic force and electric current

 

 

Week of March 6 – March 10

S8P4. Students will explore the wave nature of sound and electromagnetic radiation.

c. Explain how the human eye sees objects and colors in terms of wavelengths.

d. Describe how the behavior of waves is affected by medium (such as air, water, solids).

e. Relate the properties of sound to everyday experiences.

Vision and electromagnetic waves:

-how the eye sees and interprets objects

-electromagnetic spectrum

Sound:

-effect of sound pitch on frequency, wavelength and amplitude of the wave.

-Doppler Effect

Review and Quiz

 

Week of February 27 – March 3

S8P4. Students will explore the wave nature of sound and electromagnetic radiation.

a. Identify the characteristics of electromagnetic and mechanical waves.

b.  Describe how the behavior of light waves is manipulated causing reflection, refraction diffraction, and absorption.

f. Diagram the parts of the wave and explain how the parts are affected by changes in amplitude and pitch.

Waves:

Electromagnetic waves

Mechanical waves

Transverse waves

Longitudinal waves

Compare and contrast transverse and longitudinal waves

Wave properties:- crest, trough, amplitude, wave length, frequency.

 

Unit Vocabulary:

frequency – number of waves produced in a certain amount of time

amplitude – maximum distance from trough to crest in a wave

mechanical wave – wave that must have a medium to travel through

wave -a disturbance in solid, liquid or gas as energy is transmitted through it

wavelength -distance from any point on a wave to the identical point on the next wave

wave speed – how fast a wave travels through a medium

reflection -bouncing back of a ray/wave when it hits a surface it does not pass through

refraction – bending of a wave as it passes between 2 substances, the speed of the wave differs

diffraction -change in direction of a wave when it finds an obstacle

absorption -transfer of light energy to matter

color –  quality of an object or substance with respect to light reflected by the object, usually determined visually by measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected light

light– electromagnetic radiation that is visible to the human eye; wavelength in the range of about 380 nanometers (nm) to about 740 nanometers (nm)

medium -physical environment that a wave travels through

ultraviolet -corresponding with light, wavelengths shorter than 4000 au

infrared -waves you cannot see

sound – longitudinal wave caused by vibrations, must have medium

pitch -measure of how high or low a sound is perceived, depends on frequency

resonance -when 2 objects naturally vibrate at same frequency

 

 

 

Week of February 6 – February 18

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

c. Demonstrate the effect of simple machines (lever, inclined plane, pulley, wedge, screw, and wheel and axle) on work.

Simple Machines continued.

Flip book

Computer game:  Students locate simple machines in each room of the house (kitchen, living room, bathroom, bedroom etc.)

Students locate different simple machines in a complex machine.

Quiz on Simple machines

 

 

 

Week of January 23 – February 3

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

c. Demonstrate the effect of simple machines (lever, inclined plane, pulley, wedge, screw, and wheel and axle) on work.

Newton’s Laws of Motion

-Real life examples

Pre-teach Vocabulary on simple machines;

-lever, inclined plane, pulley,  wedge, screw, wheel and axle

UNIT VOCBULARY:

wheel and axle – simple machine consisting of 2 circular objects of different sizes

inclined plane – simple machine with straight slanted surface, facilitates raising loads

lever -simple machine consisting of a bar that pivots at a fixed point called fulcrum

pulley – simple machine consists of a wheel over which a rope, chain or wire pass

screw – simple machine consists of an inclined plane wrapped around a cylinder

wedge – simple machine made of 2 inclined planes and moves

work – transfer of energy to an object using a force that causes the object to move in the direction of the force

 

 

Week of January 17 – January 20

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration

b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

Review

-balanced and unbalanced forces

-net force

Inertia

Friction

Gravity

 

Week of January 9 – January 13

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration

b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

Review:

Motion graphs

Forces

-net force

-balanced and unbalanced forces

-inertia

-friction

 

Week of January 5 – January 6

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

S8P2. Students will be familiar with the forms and transformations of energy.

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

Review of the above standards

 

 

Week of December 12 – December 21

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration

b. Demonstrate the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object in terms of gravity, inertia, and friction.

-more practice on motion graphs

Forces

-net force

-balanced and unbalanced forces

-inertia

-friction

 

 

Week of November 28 – December 9

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration.

Force and motion Pretest

Speed, Velocity, and Acceleration

-definitions

-calculations

Use charts, tables to plot and interpret graphs on

-constant speed

-positive acceleration

-negative acceleration

 

Unit Vocabulary:

Friction – a force that opposes motion between two surfaces that are in contact

Force – push or pull exerted on an object in order to change the motion

Gravity – force of attraction between 2 objects because of their masses

Inertia -tendency of an object to remain in motion or at rest unless acted upon by outside force

net force – combination of all the forces acting on a n object

acceleration -rate at which a velocity changes over time

displacement – total distance traveled by an object

motion – objects change in position relative to a reference point

velocity – speed of an object in a particular direction

wheel and axle – simple machine consisting of 2 circular objects of different sizes

inclined plane – simple machine with straight slanted surface, facilitates raising loads

lever -simple machine consisting of a bar that pivots at a fixed point called fulcrum

pulley – simple machine consists of a wheel over which a rope, chain or wire pass

screw – simple machine consists of an inclined plane wrapped around a cylinder

wedge – simple machine made of 2 inclined planes and moves

work – transfer of energy to an object using a force that causes the object to move in the direction of the force

 

 

Week of November 14 – November 18

S8P3. Students will investigate relationship between force, mass, and the motion of objects.

a. Determine the relationship between velocity and acceleration.

 

Week of October 31 – November 11

S8P2. Students will be familiar with the forms and transformations of energy.

a. Explain energy transformation in terms of the Law of Conservation of Energy

b. Explain the relationship between potential and kinetic energy.

c. Compare and contrast the different forms of energy (heat, light, electricity, mechanical motion, and sound) and their characteristics.

Students will;

-Carry out a scientific investigation

-Write a scientific explanation on The Effect of Potential Energy on Kinetic Energy using the C. E. R. format (Claim, Evidence, Reasoning)

-Energy transformation

-Compare and contrast different forms of energy

Vocabulary:

energy – capacity to do work

potential energy – energy an object has because of position, shape or conditional; energy at rest

kinetic energy – energy of an object due to the objects motion

energy transformation – process of changing one form of energy to another

conduction – transfer of energy from one object to another by direct contact

radiation – transfer of energy as electromagnetic waves

temperature – measure of how hot or cold something is; measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in the object

heat – energy transferred between objects that are different temperatures

 

Week of October 17 – October 28

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

f. Recognize that there are more than 100 elements and some have similar properties as shown on the Periodic Table of Elements.

-atomic structure (protons, neutrons, nucleus, electrons, atomic number, atomic mass)

-arrangement of elements on the periodic table.

-practice with blank periodic table

-answer various questions on periodic table

-atoms, molecules, compounds, pure substances, mixtures review

-periodic table of elements review

-test

 

 

Week of October 3 – October 14

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

a. Distinguish between atoms and molecules.

b. Describe the difference between pure substances (elements and compounds) and mixtures.(Focus on elements)

Students will take a pretest on atoms, molecules, compounds, pure substances and mixtures

-Illustrate and explain the structure of an atom

-Illustrate and explain how molecules are formed

-Distinguish between atoms and molecules

Introduction to Periodic Table

 

Unit Vocabulary:

Atom – the smallest unit of an element that maintains the chemical properties of that element

Proton – positively charged particle in the center of the atom

Neutron – neutrally charged particle in the center of the atom

Nucleus – center of the atom, contains protons and neutrons

Electron – negatively charged particle that lives outside of the nucleus

Element – a substance that cannot be separated or broken down into simpler substances by physical or chemical means

Molecule – the smallest part of a substance that keeps the chemical properties of that substance

Compound – a substance made of two or more atoms chemically combined

Mixtures -combination of 2 or more substances not chemically combined

Periodic Table of the Elements – table that organizes all elements based on specific properties and characteristics

Period – horizontal row of elements

Atomic mass – mass of an atom, in atomic mass units, located under element symbol

Atomic number – number of protons in the nucleus

 

Week of September 12 – September 23

S8P2. Students will be familiar with the forms and transformations of energy.

d. Describe how heat can be transferred through matter by the collisions of atoms (conduction) or through space (radiation). In a liquid or gas, currents will facilitate the transfer of heat (convection).

This week students will learn different ways heat is transferred through

-Radiation

-Conduction

-Convection

Students will relate each method of heat transfer to every day life.

Demonstrations on different methods of heat transfer in cooking and around us.

-boiling spaghetti, rice, etc

-cooking bacon

-grilling steak etc

Food Menu Project

Test

 

 

Week of September 6 – September 9

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

c. Describe the movement of particles in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas states.

g. Identify and demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter.

Students will compare the different phases of matter using appropriate terms

-freezing point/melting point

-boiling point/condensation

Law of Conservation of Matter: Demonstrations using-

  • cookie
  • baking soda and vinegar

 

 

Week of August 29 – September 2

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

c. Describe the movement of particles in solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas states.

d. Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of matter as physical (i.e., density, melting point, boiling point) or chemical (i.e., reactivity, combustibility).

e. Distinguish between changes in matter as physical (i.e., physical change) or chemical (development of a gas, formation of precipitate, and change in color).

This week students will learn/demonstrate movement of particles in:

-Solid

-Liquid

-Gas

-Plasma

Unit Vocabulary:

Matter – anything that has mass and takes up space

Volume – the amount of space an object takes up

Mass – measure of the amount of matter in an object

Weight -measure of the gravitational pull on an object

Density – measure of the amount mass in a given volume

 

 

Week of August 22 – August 26

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

d. Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of matter as physical (i.e., density, melting point, boiling point) or chemical (i.e., reactivity, combustibility).

e. Distinguish between changes in matter as physical (i.e., physical change) or chemical (development of a gas, formation of precipitate, and change in color).

Test on Physical and Chemical properties

Physical and Chemical changes

-real life examples

-differences between them

-test on physical and chemical change

 

Week of August 8 – August 19

S8P1. Students will examine the scientific view of the nature of matter.

d. Distinguish between physical and chemical properties of matter as physical (i.e., density, melting point, boiling point) or chemical (i.e., reactivity, combustibility).

  • Matter
  • Measuring mass and volume
  • Density lab and calculations
  • Properties of Matter – Physical and chemical properties of matter
  •  Physical and Chemical changes – Differences

 

 

Week of August 1 – August 5  (2016/2017)

-Puff Mobil Activities

-School, Classroom, Restroom and Cafeteria Procedures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week of April 25 – April 29

Standard:

S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the earth’s surface is formed.

Element: e

Recognize that lithospheric plates constantly move and cause major geological events on the earth’s surface.

Plate boundaries ad their effect on earth and society

-Causes and effects of earthquakes

-Recent earthquakes in Japan and Ecuador

 

Week of April 11 – April 22

Units 1 – 6 Review

EOG Tests

 

Week of March 28 – April 1

Unit Review and Test

Rocks and Minerals

Plate Tectonics

Weathering and Erosion

 

The Solar System and Earth in the Universe: Week of March 14 – March 25

S6E1. Students will explore current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved.

a. Relate the Nature of Science to the progression of basic historical scientific models (geocentric, heliocentric) as they describe our solar system, and the Big Bang as it describes the formation of the universe.

b. Describe the position of the solar system in the Milky Way galaxy and the universe.

c. Compare and contrast the planets in terms of

  • Size relative to the earth
  • Surface and atmospheric features
  • Relative distance from the sun
  • Ability to support life

e.  Explain that gravity is the force that governs the motion in the solar system.

f. Describe the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteors.

The planets and their relative distance from the sun.

-inner and outer planets and their characteristics

-compare the planets relative sizes to the sun, and ability to support life

-comets, asteroids, and meteors

The Big Bang Theory

-Theories of the Solar system

Effect of Gravity and Inertia on movement of planets

 

UNIT VOCABULARY:

Heliocentric– Copernicus theory that Sun is the center of the universe.

Geocentric-Ptolemy theory that Earth is the center of the universe.

Solar system– The Sun and the planets orbiting the Sun

Universe-All the seen and unseen material in space.

Galaxy-Large groups of stars, dust, and gas.

Big Bang Theory-The theory that the universe began with a tremendous explosion.

Milky Way galaxy-The galaxy in which our solar system is located, spiral galaxy.

Comet-small body of ice, rock, and cosmic dust that follows an elliptical orbit around the sun and that gives off gas and dust in the form of a tail as it passes close to the sun

Meteor-a bright streak of light that results when a meteoroid burns up in Earth’s atmosphere.

Meteoroid– a relatively small, rocky body that travels through space

Asteroid-small, rocky object that orbits the sun

Gravity– Force that holds the planets in orbit. The force that holds the universe together

 

 

Seasons and Phases of the Moon: Week of March 7 – March 11

S6E2. Students will understand the effects of the relative positions of the earth, moon and sun.

  1. Demonstrate the phases of the moon by showing the alignment of the earth, moon, and sun.
  2. Explain the alignment of the earth, moon, and sun during solar and lunar eclipses.
  3. Relate the tilt of the earth to the distribution of sunlight throughout the year and its effect on climate.

Rotation and Revolution

Tilt of the earth and the seasons

Phases of the Moon

Unit Vocabulary

Moon Phases– caused by the changing positions of the Earth, the sun, and the moon.

First quarter– about one week after a new moon, when right half of the moon is illuminated by the sun.

Full moon– The entire half of the moon facing the Earth is illuminated by the sun.

The earth is between the moon and the sun

New moon-The entire half of the moon facing the Earth is unlit by the sun.

The moon is between the earth and the sun

Third quarter moon– When half of the left side of the moon is lit.

High tide– the tide at its highest level

Low tide– the tide at its lowest level

Spring tide– Occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon are in straight alignment.

Causes the highest and the lowest tides

Neap tide– Occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon are at right angles to each other.

Tilt of the Earth– 23.5 degrees. Reason for the seasons.

Solar eclipse– the passing of the moon between Earth and the sun; during a solar eclipse, the shadow of the moon falls on Earth.

Lunar eclipse– the passing of the moon through the Earth’s shadow at full moon

Earth’s axis-The imaginary line on which the Earth spins. Tilted 23.5 degrees.

 

 

Climate and Weather: Week of February 22 –  March 4

S6E4. Students will understand how the distribution of land and oceans affects climate and weather.

a. Demonstrate that land and water absorb and lose heat at different rates and explain the resulting effects on weather patterns.

b. Relate unequal heating of land and water surfaces to form large global wind systems and weather events such as tornados and thunderstorms.

c. Relate how moisture evaporating from the oceans affects the weather patterns and weather events such as hurricanes.

Global Winds

Local Winds

-Land and Sea Breezes

-Mountain and Valley Breezes

Layers of the Atmosphere and their characteristics

Air masses, Fronts and associated weather

Severe Weather

-Lightening

-Thunderstorm

-Tornado

-Hurricane

Review

Unit test

Please refer to unit vocabulary below

 

Climate and Weather: Week of February 1 –  February 12

S6E4. Students will understand how the distribution of land and oceans affects climate and weather.

  1. Demonstrate that land and water absorb and lose heat at different rates and explain the resulting effects on weather patterns.
  2. Relate unequal heating of land and water surfaces to form large global wind systems and weather events such as tornados and thunderstorms.
  3. Relate how moisture evaporating from the oceans affects the weather patterns and weather events such as hurricanes.

Unit Vocabulary:

Atmosphere– mixture of gases that surrounds Earth

Air pressure – the force of air molecules pushing on a surface

Wind – movement of air caused by differences in air pressure

Global winds– Predictable air mass movement at every 30 degrees of latitude.

Land breeze– Breeze flowing from land to the sea (night time)

Sea breeze– Breeze flowing from sea to land (day time)

Coriolis effect– Curving of the  winds and ocean currents due to the Earth’s rotation.

Air mass– large body of air where temperature and moisture are similar throughout.

Continental– air mass that forms over land, dry.

Maritime– Air mass that forms over oceans.

Tropical– air mass that forms over the Tropics.

Polar– Air mass that forms over the polar regions, cold.

Warm front– A warm front forms where warm air moves over cold, denser air.

Cold front– A cold front forms where cold air moves under warm air

Occluded front– Warm air mass is caught between two colder air masses.

Stationary front – Cold air mass meets a warm air mass and move very little

Hurricane– A severe storm formed over tropical oceans and with winds greater than  120 km/h (74mph)

Thunderstorm– Intense weather systems that produce strong winds, heavy rain, lightning, and thunder.

Tornado– A destructive, rotating column of air that has very high wind speeds and that may be visible as a funnel-shaped cloud.

Lightning– An electric discharge that occurs between a positively charged area and a negatively charged area.

Greenhouse effect– Process by which gases in the atmosphere, such as water vapor and carbon dioxide, absorb thermal energy and radiate it back to Earth

 

 

Hydrology: Week of January 19 – January 29

S6E3 Students will recognize the significant role of water in earth processes

a.      Explain that a large portion of the Earth’s surface is water, consisting of oceans, rivers, lakes, underground water, and ice

b.     Relate various atmospheric conditions to stages of the water cycle.

d.       Explain the causes of waves, currents, and tides.

Unit Vocabulary:

Water cycle– Water moving continuously from the ocean/land to the sky and back

Evaporation– Liquid water changing to water vapor and rising to the atmosphere

Condensation– Water vapor changing to liquid and forming clouds.

Precipitation– Rain, Sleet, Snow, or Hail falling down

Transpiration– Evaporation from plants

Runoff– Water flowing on the ground due to gravity

Infiltration– Water sinking into the ground

Fresh water– Water in lakes, rivers, underground, and glaciers

Salt water– Ocean water

Aquifer– Water stored under ground

Groundwater– Water held in soil and rock crevices

Surface currents– Ocean surface water movement

Tides– The rise and fall of the ocean water due to moon’s gravity and partly by the sun

Continental shelf– Gentle sloping seabed near the land

Continental slope– Outer edge of the continental shelf to the ocean floor

Continental rise– Ocean floor between the continental slope and the abyssal plain.

Mid-ocean ridges– Ocean floor mountain system form by plate tectonics

Seamounts– Mountains under the ocean

Volcanic island– Island above the ocean surface form from seamounts

Ocean trench– Deepest parts of the ocean floor at a subduction zone

Renewable resources– Resources that can be continually replaced.

Nonrenewable resources– Resources that are used faster than it is made

 

 

 

Hydrology: Week of January 4 – January 15

S6E3 Students will recognize the significant role of water in earth processes

a.      Explain that a large portion of the Earth’s surface is water, consisting of oceans, rivers, lakes, underground water, and ice

c.      Describe the composition, location, and subsurface topography of oceans of the world .

Composition of World’s oceans

Earth’s Water Distribution

-salt water

-fresh water

-underground water

-usable water

Water Cycle

-evaporation, condensation, precipitation, transpiration, run off, infiltration

Water Pollution and Conservation

 

 

Hydrology: Week of December 7 – December 18

S6E3 Students will recognize the significant role of water in earth processes

a.      Explain that a large portion of the Earth’s surface is water, consisting of oceans, rivers, lakes, underground water, and ice

b.     Relate various atmospheric conditions to stages of the water cycle.

c.      Describe the composition, location, and subsurface topography of oceans of the world .

 

Unit 3 : Reteach and Retest

Unit 4: Pretest

Ocean floor topography

Location and composition of world’s oceans

 

UNIT 4   VOCABULARY

 

Water cycle– Water moving continuously from the ocean/land to the sky and back

Evaporation– Liquid water changing to water vapor and rising to the atmosphere

Condensation– Water vapor changing to liquid and forming clouds.

Precipitation– Rain, Sleet, Snow, or Hail falling down

Transpiration– Evaporation from plants

Runoff– Water flowing on the ground due to gravity

Infiltration– Water sinking into the ground

Fresh water– Water in lakes, rivers, underground, and glaciers

Salt water– Ocean water

Aquifer– Water stored under ground

Groundwater– Water held in soil and rock crevices

Surface currents– Ocean surface water movement

Tides– The rise and fall of the ocean water due to moon’s gravity and partly by the sun

Continental shelf– Gentle sloping seabed near the land

Continental slope– Outer edge of the continental shelf to the ocean floor

Continental rise– Ocean floor between the continental slope and the abyssal plain.

Mid-ocean ridges– Ocean floor mountain system form by plate tectonics

Seamounts– Mountains under the ocean

Volcanic island– Island above the ocean surface form from seamounts

Ocean trench– Deepest parts of the ocean floor at a subduction zone

Renewable resources– Resources that can be continually replaced.

Nonrenewable resources– Resources that are used faster than it is made

 

Week of November 30 – December 4

S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the earth’s surface is formed.

e. Recognize that lithospheric plates constantly move and cause major geological events on the earth’s surface.

f. Explain the effects of physical processes (plate tectonics, erosion, deposition, volcanic eruption, gravity) on geological features including oceans.

Theory of Plate Tectonics

Types of Plate boundaries

-Convergent boundaries

-Divergent boundaries

-Transform boundaries

Plate boundaries and resulting geologic features

Convergent boundaries:

  • oceanic – continental
  • oceanic – oceanic
  • continental – continental

Divergent boundaries

  • oceanic- oceanic
  • continental – continental

Transform boundaries

Unit Review

Unit Test

 

 

Week of November 9 – November 20

S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the earth’s surface is formed.

a. Compare and contrast the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core including temperature, density, and composition.

e. Recognize that lithospheric plates constantly move and cause major geological events on the earth’s surface.

f. Explain the effects of physical processes (plate tectonics, erosion, deposition, volcanic eruption, gravity) on geological features including oceans.

g. Describe how fossils show evidence of the changing surface and climate of the Earth.

Fossils:

-Types

-Why they are important

Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift Theory:

-Alfred Wegener and Pangaea

-Evidence of Continental Drift

 

Week of November 2 – November 6

S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed.

Element a. Compare and contrast the Earth’s crust, mantle, and core including temperature, density, and composition.

e. Recognize that lithospheric plates constantly move and cause major geological events on the Earth’s surface.

Unit Pre-test

Layers of the earth

– compare layers in terms of temperature, density, composisition

-density lab

 

UNIT 3 VOCABULARY

Crust – The outermost layer of the Earth

Mantle – The layer of the Earth between the crust and the outer core

Core – The earth layer that extends from below the mantle to the center of the Earth.

Outer core– liquid part of core, made of molten iron and nickel

Inner core – solid part of core, mostly made of solid iron

Asthenosphere – a plastic layer of the mantle on which pieces of the lithosphere move

Lithosphere– the crust and the rigid upper part of

Seismic waves– earthquake waves that travel out from the earthquake in all directions.

Convection currents– Fluid movement due to differences in temperature and density

Sea floor spreading – Ocean floor separating as magma rises and solidifies.

Convergent boundary– Boundary between tectonic plates that are colliding

Divergent boundaries– Boundary between two tectonic plates that are separating

Transform boundary– Boundary between tectonic plates that are sliding past each other horizontally

Continental drift– Hypothesis that states that the continents once formed a single landmass, broke up, and drifted to their present locations.

Tectonic plates– Pieces of the lithosphere that move top of the asthenosphere.

Pangaea – All of the present continents were once joined in a single, huge continent.

Fossil evidence – Similar fossils on different continents supporting continental drift

Mountain building– Mountains resulting from colliding convergent plates

Faults – Breaks in the Earth’s crust

Volcano – A place where hot liquid magma reaches the surface.

 

 

Week of October 19 – October 30

Standard: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed.

Elements:  h. Describe soil as consisting of weathered rocks and decomposed organic material.

i.  Explain the effects of human activity on the erosion of the earth’s surface.          

                  j. Describe methods for conserving natural resources such as water, soil, and air

Soil :

-Formation

-Profile

– Soil erosion and human effect

-Soil conservation

Renewable and Nonrenewable Resources

Unit Review and Test

 

 

Week of October 5 – October 16

Standard: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed.

Elements: d: Describe processes that change rocks and the surface of the earth

                  h. Describe soil as consisting of weathered rocks and decomposed organic material.

Chemical Weathering

-Agents of chemical weathering: acid precipitation, air, water, plant action.

Erosion and Deposition:

-agents

-features

Soil Formation

 

 

Week of September 28 – October 2

Standard: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed.

Elements: d: Describe processes that change rocks and the surface of the earth

Weathering:

-Mechanical/Physical weathering

-Agents of Mechanical weathering

 

Unit Vocabulary:

Weathering– Breaking down rocks into smaller pieces

Erosion– The process by which sediment is removed from its source

Chemical Weathering– Breaking down rocks through a chemical change

Mechanical Weathering– Breaking down rocks physically

Abrasion– Grinding and wearing down rock surfaces physically

Iron– Naturally occurring element that rust when exposed to oxygen

Gravity– An invisible force that causes objects to be pulled each other

Ice wedging– Breaking down rocks through repeated freezing and thawing

Acid rain– Rain that contains above normal acid

Renewable resources– Resources that can be continually replaced.

Nonrenewable resources– Resources that are used faster than it is made

Conservation– Protection, preservation, or restoration of the natural environment.

Organic matter– Biological material that is decaying or decomposing, such as humus.

Horizons- Specific Layers of soil.

 

Week of September 14 – September 18

Standards: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed

Element c. Classify rocks by their process of formation.

-Metamorphic Rocks: Formation and classification

-Rock Cycle

-Almost There Test

-Acceleration/Remediation

-Unit 1 Test

 

 

Week of August 31 – September 11

Standards: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth’s surface is formed

Element c. Classify rocks by their process of formation.

-Classification of rocks according to the way they are formed. Igneous, Sedimentary, metamorphic

-Igneous rocks: Intrusive – formed inside the earth

Extrusive – formed on the surface of the earth

-Features of intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks

-Sedimentary rocks: formation and features

-weathering, erosion, deposition, compaction, cementation

-Types of sedimentary rocks:- clastic, organic, chemical

-Remember to refer to unit 1 vocabulary below.

 

Week of  August 24 – 28

Standards: S6E5. Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth surface is formed.

Element b. Investigate the composition of rocks in terms of minerals.

-Identifying Minerals in terms of:

color, streak, luster, density, hardness, cleavage/fracture, and special properties.

Why is color not a very good test for identifying Minerals?

-Test on Minerals

-Most Wanted Mineral Activities/Posters

Homework: -Study for Mineral Test

– Complete Most Wanted Mineral Poster.

 

Week of August 17 – 21

Standards: Students will investigate the scientific view of how the Earth surface is formed.

Element b. Investigate the composition of rocks in terms of minerals.

-Rocks and minerals Pre-test

Characteristics Of Minerals

– What makes a substance a Mineral?

Home work: -Read the highlighted handout and answer questions on the side of the pages.

-Make your own song using the 5 characteristics of Minerals.

 

Unit Vocabulary:

Lab safety, goggles, aprons, safety symbols.

Mineral– Naturally formed inorganic solid with a crystal structure.

Rock– Naturally occurring solid mixture of one or more minerals and organic matter.

Inorganic-Is not alive, never has been alive.

Crystalline– A solid whose atoms, ions, or molecules are arranged in a definite pattern

Composition– The materials that an object is made from.

Texture– The size, shape, and positions of the grains that make up a rock.

Rock cycle– The continual process by which new rock forms from old rock material.

Weathering– The process in which water, wind, ice, and heat break down rock.

Erosion– The process by which sediment is removed from its source

Deposition– depositing or dropping sediment

Compaction– layers of sediment pressed together with pressure

Cementation– hardening layers of rock together

Igneous– Latin word that means “fire.” Forms when lava or magma, cools and solidifies.

Metamorphic– type of rock formed by heat and pressure

Sediment– tiny weathered rock particles

Sedimentary– type of rock formed by the deposition of sediment

Intrusive– rock formed as magma cools and solidifies beneath Earth’s surface.

Extrusive– rock that forms from the cooling and solidification of lava at Earth’s surface

Coarse-grained– rock with large mineral crystals, cooled slowly, intrusive

Fine-grained– rock with small or no evident mineral crystals, cooled quickly, extrusive

Foliated (banded)– thin separate layers are evident in rock

Non-foliated (non-banded)– no separate layers are evident in the rock

 

Week of August 10 – August 15: Scientific Method

Standard: S6CS1 – Students will explore the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

Element a. Understand the importance of – and keep – honest, clear, and accurate records in science.

Element b. Understand that hypotheses are valuable if they lead to fruitful investigations, even if the hypotheses turn out not to be completely accurate descriptions.

Rocks and Minerals Pretest.

 

Week of August 3 – 7

– Getting to know you activities

-School Rules and Procedures

-Class Rules and Procedures

-Lab Safety Rules

Homework: Get syllabus home for parent signature and bring back to Mrs. Anuforo.

 

 

 

 

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