4th Period Algebra II with Bonani

Week of  October 16-20, 2017

Week of  October 9-13, 2017

Monday – Long Division of Polynomials Video and Notes

Tuesday – Synthetic Division Video and Notes

Synthetic Division Extra Practice

Wednesday, October 11    PSAT Today

Wednesday – PSAT during 1st & 2nd periods/4th period will review division

Thursday, October 12    Today is Early Release

Thursday – More practice with division

Friday – Quiz

Week of  October 2-6

Monday – Factoring Review Factoring Review

Tuesday – Factoring by Grouping Video and Notes

Wednesday – Sum/Difference of Cubes Notes and Video

Thursday – Review

Friday – Quiz

Week of  September 18-22

Monday:  Function Operations

Tuesday:  Inverses and  Composition of Functions

Wednesday:  Inverses and Composition of Functions (con’t)

Thursday:  Review

Friday

UNIT 2 TEST
Polynomial Functions

Week of  September 11-15

 Monday

– Relative Maximum & Minimum

Tuesday

Intervals of Increasing & Decreasing

Wednesday

End Behavior

Thursday

Review Characteristics of Polynomials

Friday

Quiz

Monday

LABOR DAY

NO SCHOOL

Tuesday

Writing in Interval Notation Video and Notes

 

Wednesday

 – Domain and Range Video and Practice

Thursday

Intercepts/Minimums & Maximums

Characteristics of Polynomial Functions and Notes

Friday

Quiz

Week of August 28 – September 1

Monday – Quadratic Formula Video and Notes

Tuesday – Quadratic Formula Video and Practice

Wednesday – Review Examples of all types of solving quadratics

Don’t forget we have an Early Release Day on Wednesday, 8/30!  Dismissal at 11:30.

Thursday – Review

Friday – Unit Test (Quadratics)

No school Monday for Labor Day!

Have a nice long weekend!

Week of August 21-25

Monday

Eclipse (we will NOT be going outside but we will watch it via live feed)

Tuesday

Review factoring
– Solving quadratic equations by factoring
– HW:

Wednesday

Simplifying square roots
– Solving quadratic equations using the square root method
– HW:

Thursday

Solving Quadratic equations by completing the square
– HW:

Friday

Continue practicing the completing the square method
QUIZ

Week of August 14-18

It’s Hoya Pride Week!  Here is a flyer with our Hoya Pride Dress Up days for the week.

Monday – Factoring Greatest Common Factors Notes and VideoTuesday – Factoring Trinomials Notes and VideoWednesday – Factoring Trinomials, continued and  VideoThursday – Review Factoring GCF and TrinomialsFriday -Review and Quiz

Week of August 7-11

Monday

Add, subtract & multiply complex numbers

– INB p. 13-14

– HW:

Tuesday

Conjugates of complex numbers & dividing complex numbers
– INB p. 15
– HW:

Wednesday

– Complex # BINGO review
– HW:

Thursday

– Polynomial & Complex # Review
– Hoyas in the House
– HW:

Friday

Unit 1A  
Polynomial Operations & Complex #s Test

Week of July 31 – August 4th

Monday

Welcome Back To School!!!

 My name is Carol Burrows and I will be co-teaching this semester:

4th period Alg 2/support with Mrs. Bonani

Feel free to contact me for any classroom related information, any questions regarding the special education aspects of the course and/or support services.

Please refer to the course links to find helpful information to assist with daily work, reminders, test preparation, and/or remediation.

– Welcome, Syllabus & Class Rules
– Significant Numbers & T-shirt activity
– 31 Group activity
– HW:  Have parents sign up for Remind texts & get supplies

Tuesday

Basics of Polynomials:Simplifying & Naming

– Set up Interactive Notebook (INB)
– INB p. 7-10
– HW:  2 sided wkst (Intro to Polynomials & Combining Like Terms)

Wednesday

Add and Subtract Polynomial Expressions
– INB
– HW

Thursday

Multiply Polynomials
– INB

– HW:

Friday

Review Polynomial Operations with partners
Quiz over polynomial classification and operations
– 31 Group activity

2nd and 3rd period with Miss Casey

 Week of August 7-11

Monday, August 7

SpringBoard Activity 1.2, pp. 6-8

  1. Activate prior knowledge: students will view pizza ads
    1. Domino’s 5 senses Buttery Crust https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUoKi5RVwqI
    2. Domino’s Trump eats pizza “wrong way” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-XgMymBIY0
    3. Dessert Pizza https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IMaEGp-yv8
    4. Blake Shelton bbq pizza https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7p6M/pizza-hut-barbecue-pizzas-featuring-blake-shelton
  2. On a separate sheet of paper, students will write the opening quickwrite #1 on p. 6.
  3. Students share their paragraphs. Discuss how a person’s written words can contain a “fingerprint” that helps to identify the writer–voice.
  4. Review diction, sentence structure, or syntax, imagery, including sensory language and figurative language.
  5. Students will close read the paragraph, marking the text to underline the diction, syntax, and imagery that most strongly contribute to the voice they identified in the passage.
  6. INDEPENDENT READING: Conduct brief book talks for the books you recommend for independent reading. Your summaries and a shared reading of an interesting passage can engage students in selecting texts. Students will encounter multiple activities in this unit that refer to their independent reading.

Tuesday, August 8

SpringBoard Activity 1.3, pp. 9-12

  1. Preview the double-entry journal on p. 9. Possibilities for journal entries: • Identify specific textual features that contribute to the writer’s voice. • Select quotations that establish a characterization of the subject. • Comment on the narrator’s use of humor. • React to emotional events that happen in the text. • Identify societal issues presented in the texts and try to infer the author’s stance on the issues. • Predict how certain events relate to a character’s coming of age.
  2. Read the Preview and the Setting a Purpose for Reading sections p. 9. A writer’s choice of words creates voice, engages readers, and suggests meaning.
  3. Read the excerpt from Speak on pp. 10-11. Highlight unknown words and add to IAN Vocab Journal.
  4. Direct students’ attention to the information on dashes in the Grammar & Usage feature p.10. Ask for volunteers to read paragraphs 2 and 4 and discuss the effect of the dash after each reading. Ask students to find other sentences with dashes and to think about how the use of dashes affects tone.
  5. Consider these analytical questions while reading: • Paragraph 1, “swim” imagery: What does the image created by this metaphor suggest about the speaker’s feelings? • Paragraph 2: High school can be so judgmental. “I remember …” And make a personal connection. • Paragraph 2: Why the rhetorical questions? • Paragraph 3: What tone (her attitude) does her diction (word choice) suggest regarding school food? • Paragraph 3: What is the hyperbolic description of a senior used to show? • Paragraph 4: What is ironic about her calling Heather “the new girl?”
  6. As students are reading, they will annotate words or phrases that create voice. Encourage students to find words to enter into the Vocabulary Journal section of their IAN.
  7. Students will read the text again to answer the text dependent comprehension questions on pp. 11-12. Give one question (along with the scaffolded questions) to each group. Have groups with the same question confer before sharing with the class all four questions.  Students should listen and write in answers to all four questions.
  8. Have students complete the Working from the Text activity on p. 12 by completing the graphic organizer and exchanging it with a partner to compare responses.
  9. Students will complete the Check Your Understanding on p. 12. Choose two quotes that depict the voice of a teenage girl through the author’s use of diction, syntax, and imagery. Share inferences about Melinda with the class.
  10. INDEPENDENT READING: Students may still be choosing a book to read.

Wednesday, August 9

SpringBoard Activity 1.4, pp. 13-15

  1. This activity introduces the language focus for this unit. You can reinforce students’ study of this rhetorical form by asking them to be on the lookout for parallel structure in their readings.
  2. Read the paragraph on Syntax and Parallel Structure on p. 13. Review the three different ways to create parallelism in a sentence.
  3. Point out the Grammar & Usage feature, and highlight the use of correlative conjunctions in the parallel sentences.
  4. Have students correct the examples of faulty parallelism on p. 13-14. They should also note the correlative conjunctions.
  5. Complete Power of the Parallel on pp. 14-15. Do excerpt #1 as a model for the class. After students have completed the other examples, compare results.
  6. Students will correct the examples of faulty parallelism in Check Your Understanding p.15. SpringBoard Activity 1.5, pp. 16-27
  1. This activity scaffolds the central theme of coming of age while also reinforcing students’ understanding of voice, inference, flashback, and juxtaposition.
  2. Draw or project a line and label the beginning of the line “Childhood,” and the end of the line “Old Age.” Ask students where coming of age happens. When does the process of coming of age start and end? (Students might not agree on a specific number; the discussion is meant only to inspire them to think about approximate ages.)
  3. Pose a discussion question: How old you have to be to write your own coming-of-age story?
  4. Explain juxtaposition and provide examples. Then explain flashback as a narrative device, especially when used in coming-of-age stories.
  5. Read the Preview and the Setting a Purpose for Reading sections on p. 16 with your students. Help them encounter how a writer’s choice of words and phrases creates imagery and voice.
  6. FIRST READ: As students are reading, students should annotate words or phrases that create interesting imagery or the narrator’s voice.
    1. The imagery in Paragraphs 23 and 28 is an important connection to the juxtaposition of imagery set up in the opening paragraphs. The narrator’s voice creates a sense of the symbolic significance of these images.
    2. Consider using cloze for the sentences that contain shantytown in paragraph 1, grit in paragraph 4, exploits in paragraph 20, Furies in paragraph 53, and contrition in paragraph 63. 1

Thursday, August 10

SpringBoard Activity 1.5, pp. 16-27

  1. Review “Marigolds” pp. 16-23.
  2. SECOND READ: Students will answer the text-dependent comprehension questions. Use scaffolded questions for group work.
  3. Ask students to consider the last sentence of the story and make inferences about whether the narrator is speaking literally, metaphorically, or both. Ask them to think-pair-share ways that people plant metaphorical marigolds: what do people do to try to hold onto hope during desperate situations such as poverty, illness, mourning, loneliness, heartbreak, or depression? To get them started, you might suggest that people often listen to music, go on a hike, or watch a favorite movie when they are feeling down.
  4. Direct students to the Language and Writer’s Craft feature about Verb Mood on p. 24. Have students discuss the different types of verb mood and how writers use different verb moods to create voice.
  5. Review the definitions of denotation and connotation. Have each student complete the Working from the Text activity on p. 24.
  6. Students should complete # 8-11 on p. 25. Ask one person from each small group to share.
  7. Have students work in the same small groups to complete #12 p. 25-26.
    1. Note that the some of the quotations offered as textual evidence contain examples of parallelism. You might ask students to be especially aware of this device as a form of emphasis.
    2. Be sure students make inferences about Lizabeth’s attitudes and realizations. You might have them add another column to the graphic organizer as a place to record their inferences.
  8. After students complete the graphic organizer, ask them to work in their small groups to discuss their responses to Check Your Understanding on p. 27. Ask a variety of students to share their responses. Discuss why or why not the responses fit into “Marigolds.”
  9. In the IAN section 1 using the CEI graphic organizer, students will draft a response to the writing prompt on p. 27 with a paragraph or two in which they explain how the writer uses diction, imagery, and other literary devices to create voice and to present a particular point of view. Remind them to clearly state the thesis and to use direct quotations and transitions.
  10. Have students complete a similar paragraph explaining how the author establishes a narrator’s voice in their independent reading selections.

Friday, August 11

SpringBoard Activity LC 1.5, pp.

  1. Introduce the topic of verb voice and mood by showing these sentences on the screen:
  2. Voice: a. She remembers most the marigolds. b. The marigolds are what she remembers most. Mood: c. She remembered most the marigolds. d. Never forget the marigolds. e. She should have remembered something other than marigolds. f. Why did she remember the marigolds? g. If her childhood had been different, the marigolds may not have been so important.
  3. Have students take turns reading aloud the introduction under Reviewing Verb Voice and Mood on p. 28.
  4. Have a student volunteer read aloud the sentence in student step 1 under Exploring Verb Voice on p. 28. Have students make an observation regarding the author’s choice of active voice.
  5. Now have another student volunteer read aloud the second sentence and allow students time to make an observation regarding passive voice.
  6. Have a student read the text under Avoiding Unnecessary Shifts in Voice on p. 28.
  7. Have students read and annotate the sentence in student step 3 and write an observation about the verb voice under student step 4 on p. 28.
  8. Now direct students to the Exploring Verb Mood section on p. 29. Have a student read about imperative mood in student step 5. Have students record an observation about when they would use imperative mood.
  9. Repeat this sequence for the subjunctive mood in step 6.
  10. Explain the importance of avoiding unnecessary shifts in mood. Have students annotate the text in student step 7. Next, students will identify the mood and then write a revised sentence in the indicative mood for student step 8.
  11. Repeat this sequence for the imperative mood in steps 9 and 10.
  12. Guide students to the Revising section on p. 29, where they will revise the underlined words to correct shifts in voice and/or mood. Have students compare their answers with a partner.
  13. Students will complete the Check Your Understanding section on p. 29. Make sure their explanatory statements show that they understand the rules of verb voice and mood, rather than just stating what is incorrect.
  14. Have students return to their writing prompt responses from Activity 1.5 p. 27 to check for correct use of verb voice and mood.
  15. INDEPENDENT READING: Students should have a book they intend to read for the first 6 weeks mark.

Week of July 31 – August 4th

Monday

Welcome Back To School!!!

 My name is Carol Burrows and I will be co-teaching this semester:

2nd & 3th period 9th Lit with Miss Casey

Feel free to contact me for any classroom related information, any questions regarding the special education aspects of the course and/or support services.

Please refer to the course links to find helpful information to assist with daily work, reminders, test preparation, and/or remediation.

I am always here to help!!! Educating and each and every student is my goal!

July 31-August 4, 2017

Planning Your Week: 

Tuesday, July 31st – Friday, August 4th: Return signed syllabus

Wednesday, August 2nd: Personal Metaphors due

Friday, August 4th: Bring a 3-subject spiral notebook; Mini-Me due

Monday, July 31

LG: Learn how to be successful in this class. Reflect on personal qualities and characteristics that will guide study habits.  ELAGSE:R17 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively.

  1. Introduction
  2. TRSS sheets/Welcome sheet
  3. Distribute syllabus; please purchase a 3 subject spiral notebook
  4. Take the VIA Character Strengths survey http://www.viacharacter.org/www/The-Survey
  5. Register
  6. Take the YOUTH survey
  7. 120 questions
  8. Supply personal demographic info
  9. Write down top five strengths

 Homework: Get parent signature on syllabus and acquire 3-subject spiral notebook and materials to personalize/decorate your notebook.

Tuesday, August 1

LG: Reflect on personal qualities and characteristics that will guide study habits.  ELAGSE:R17 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively.

  1. Gather signed syllabi
  2. Complete Scholastic Reading Inventory in lab 113
  3. Create a personal metaphor (Due Wednesday)  Personal Metaphor-2j53wla

Homework: Get parent signature on syllabus and acquire 3-subject spiral notebook.

Wednesday, August 2 – Potential Book Room Day

LG: Reflect on personal qualities and characteristics that will guide study habits.  ELAGSE:R17 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively.

LG: Evaluate texts for future independent reading. ELAGSE9-10RL10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

  1. Gather signed syllabi.
  2. Share personal metaphors.
  3. Rd. Gaston; discuss Bloom’s Taxonomy and metaphors
  4. View Characters of Strength video
  5. Introduce Mini-Me assignment (Due Friday)
  6. Brainstorm personal strengths and character traits. Relate to the top three results from the survey.
  7. Begin working on your mini-me. If you do not finish the mini-me, you MUST finish it for homework.

Thursday, August 3 – Potential Book Room Day

LG: Evaluate texts for future independent reading. ELAGSE9-10RL10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

LG: Gain an understanding of the first unit of study.

  1. Gather signed syllabi.
  2. Write a letter to your future self.
  3. Introduction to SpringBoard Unit 1
  4. On p. 1, students will read the Unit Overview.
    1. Students will mark the text by highlighting words and phrases that help them predict what the unit will be about. Share responses in partner, small-group, or whole-class discussion.
    2. Students will respond to the image and the visual prompt. Record the answers on the board.
    3. Students will brainstorm a list of things they might write about if they were asked to write a coming-of-age story. Students will think-pair-share.
    4. Students will answer the Essential Question, “What does it mean to come of age?”
  5. On p. 2, students will read the goals for the unit and mark any words that are unfamiliar to them.
    1. Students add these words to the classroom Word Wall, along with definitions.
    2. Students will skim/scan the activities and texts to find a “Wow” (an activity that looks interesting) and a “Whoa” (an activity that looks challenging). Share responses in partner, small-group, or whole-class discussion.

Friday, August 4

LG: Evaluate texts for future independent reading. ELAGSE9-10RL10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

LG: Gain an understanding of the first unit of study.

  1. Gather signed syllabi.
  2. Hang up Mini Mes in your group. Divide into groups based on the main virtue your top strength falls under (Wisdom/Knowledge, Courage, Humanity, Justice, Temperance, Transcendence).
  1. Gallery walk/pairs discuss
  2. Decorate and organize 9th Literature Interactive Notebook.  Cut and paste directions into each section.
  1. Spring Board Activity 1.1 (50 min) p. 4
    1. Read aloud the learning targets; share prior learning that could help meet these goals.
    2. Read the paragraph on “Making Connections” and highlight any unknown words. Discuss the meanings.
    3. Briefly answer and discuss each Essential Question.
    4. Use the QHT strategy for words in the question.  Q: I have questions/never heard of it. H: I have heard of it/familiar. T: I could teach this concept.
    5. Read aloud the assignment for the first Embedded Assessment. Students will mark the text and think-pair-share the skills and knowledge they will need for success.
    6. Think about someone you might eventually interview. Identify potential people at this time.
    7. Read aloud the Independent Reading Plan, and answer the questions with a partner. Review expectations as noted in the Independent Reading Link.

PREVIOUS WEEKs’ AGENDAS:

  1. July 31- August 4  Week 1 Jul 31 – Aug 4-21s8d9c

STANDARDS:

STANDARDS: ELA-9-10-Grade-9-Literature-Composition-Standards-2ibo4wh

Fall Schedule

Welcome Back To School!!!

 My name is Carol Burrows and I will be co-teaching this semester:

2nd & 3th period 9th Lit with Miss Casey

4th period Alg 2 with Mrs. Bonani

Feel free to contact me for any classroom related information, any questions regarding the special education aspects of the course and/or support services.

Please refer to the course links to find helpful information to assist with daily work, reminders, test preparation, and/or remediation.

I am always here to help!!! Educating each and every student is my goal!

Quote of the Week: ‘Cowardice asks the question, ‘Is it safe?’ Expediency asks the question, ‘Is it politic?’ And Vanity comes along and asks the question, ‘Is it popular?’ But Conscience asks the question, ‘Is it right?’ ~Unknown~

BURROWS FALL SCHEDULE

1st Period  – Planning – 109back-to-school-913074_960_720

2nd Period – 9th Lit – 108

3rd Period  – 9th Lit – 108

4th Period  – Alg II – 408

Positive words of the day.

Fear can hold you prisoner, hope can set you free.

Resources

Resoures

Resources for 9th Literature

Please access the course syllabus here: 2017-18 Casey Fall 9th Lit Syllabus-13xz997

Please access Interactive Notebook Instructions here: 9th Lit Interactive Notebook-2hzl4bw

MLA Format Help:  MLA Cheat Sheet    MLA-Essay-TEMPLATE

CEI Graphic Organizer: cei_graphic_organizer_rev_f2017.docx

CEI Paragraph Rubric: cei_paragraph_rubric.docx

Math Department Make-up/Detention:

 

Math Department Extra Help: 

Math Tutoring Schedule Fall 2017-qzczjx

Make-Up Schedule Fall 2017-1zh54wy

Parents survey

2017 parent survey flyer-17xjnwf

SAT and ACT information

SAT and Other Stuff

3 SAT Tips

ACT Tips

Khan Academy

College readiness sample questions

Success-1600-overflow-spring-2017-flyer-Harrison-HS

Students will create their own account after logging in with the following info:

Account ID:   harrisonga

Student ActivitionCode:  newton91

If you would like additional training or information you can check out their numerous training sessions.  Here are a few with hyperlinks to open:

USATestprep 101: Getting Started

Watch Session 101

Live Session 101 Options

USATestprep 201: Creating Activities and Assessments

Watch Session 201

Live Session 201 Options

USATestprep 301:  Viewing Student Progress

Watch Session 301

Live Session 301 Options

 

https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Assessment/Pages/Georgia-Milestones-End-of-Course-Assessment-Guides.aspx

AP Exam: 

http://gaexperienceonline.com/

·        http://www.gavirtualschool.org/courseinfo/endofcoursetestinformation.aspx

·        https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/takingtheexam/preparing-for-exams