Propaganda Museum Walk

Hey 6th grade Social Studies students! Put your thinking caps on because it’s time to think critically. You are invited along a Propaganda Museum Walk in the media center where you will find groupings of World War II Propaganda borrowed from Cobb Digital Library’s Britannica Image Quest. Evaluate the examples identifying the tone and the representative of the subjects. Utilizing your understandings from the DBQ process, determine what the documents say, what they mean, and why they matter. Utilize your group members to facilitate discussion and evaluation of the primary source documents provided.

Use the Propaganda Museum Walk Guide, provided by Mrs. Baker, as you evaluate the posters.

Propaganda Museum Walk Folder 

The above allows access to the shared folder on Microsoft Office 365 and includes the primary source documents utilized via the Propaganda Museum Walk.

POST LESSON REFLECTION

Here are some images of your brains at work.

Double-Entry Journals: The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Hi Kiddos! It’s time to hit the books and to make personal connections with the text using a Double-Entry Journal. We will be reading the picture book The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin by Julia Finley Mosca.

Here’s a preview of the book:

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures 

Here’s what we need to know about using the strategy of a Double-Entry Journal. (Mrs. Baker will guide you through this resource.) 

We will be using a Double-Entry Journal to evaluate the text of The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Works Cited

Time, Sami & Amro Reading. “The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin | READ ALOUD PICTURE BOOK |.” YouTube, YouTube,         15 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPj0SaapJMs&t=15s.

POST LESSON REFLECTION:

Okay, kiddos. I’ve read all of your connections and have provided feedback on your papers. Here are a few reminders about using double-entry journals to help you better understand texts.

QUOTATIONS

Quotations must be copied exactly as they are in the text. After copying them down, double check their accuracy. Put quotation marks around the quotes.

CONNECTIONS

Connect SPECIFIC stories, texts, and experiences to the meaningful quotes you have selected.

Avoid generalizations. For example, the following is a generalization: “Temple Grandin is bullied and lots of people are too.” If you wish to make a connection, identify a specific story of someone who has been bullied. To make a connection to the world, the inclusion of statistics regarding bullying is necessary.

Be sure to dig deep to make meaningful connections. “Temple Grandin loses her temper, and so do I” does not provide a deep, meaningful connection. Instead, share a story of a particular time when you lost your temper or consider describing triggers that contribute to you losing your cool.

Identify whether your connection is Text to World (T-W), Text to Self (T-S), or Text to Text (T-T)

Lastly, correct grammar usage is always important. Read and reread your responses to check for proper capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.

New Books are Here!

New books are continually added to the Durham Media Center with boxes arriving via book subscriptions every month, but the newest batch of 140 books is slightly different. Students were asked to “Tell [us] what you want, what you really, really want,” and they did just that. Many of the titles purchased were student recommendations. Thanks to those of you who help us fill the media center with books you want to read about things you love and want to know more about. During this season of thanks and giving, Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Webb are thankful for our wonderful school, our beautiful media center, books–old and new, and the students and teachers who read them.