Double-Entry Journals: The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Hi Kiddos! It’s time to hit the books and to make personal connections with the text using a Double-Entry Journal. We will be reading the picture book The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin by Julia Finley Mosca.

Here’s a preview of the book:

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures 

Here’s what we need to know about using the strategy of a Double-Entry Journal. (Mrs. Baker will guide you through this resource.) 

We will be using a Double-Entry Journal to evaluate the text of The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Works Cited

Time, Sami & Amro Reading. “The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin | READ ALOUD PICTURE BOOK |.” YouTube, YouTube,         15 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPj0SaapJMs&t=15s.

POST LESSON REFLECTION:

Okay, kiddos. I’ve read all of your connections and have provided feedback on your papers. Here are a few reminders about using double-entry journals to help you better understand texts.

QUOTATIONS

Quotations must be copied exactly as they are in the text. After copying them down, double check their accuracy. Put quotation marks around the quotes.

CONNECTIONS

Connect SPECIFIC stories, texts, and experiences to the meaningful quotes you have selected.

Avoid generalizations. For example, the following is a generalization: “Temple Grandin is bullied and lots of people are too.” If you wish to make a connection, identify a specific story of someone who has been bullied. To make a connection to the world, the inclusion of statistics regarding bullying is necessary.

Be sure to dig deep to make meaningful connections. “Temple Grandin loses her temper, and so do I” does not provide a deep, meaningful connection. Instead, share a story of a particular time when you lost your temper or consider describing triggers that contribute to you losing your cool.

Identify whether your connection is Text to World (T-W), Text to Self (T-S), or Text to Text (T-T)

Lastly, correct grammar usage is always important. Read and reread your responses to check for proper capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.

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