About durhammediacenter

Durham Middle School Media Specialist Mrs. Erin Baker has worked as the MS at Durham for seven years. She previously taught English at McEachern High School followed by Harrison High School both also in the Cobb County School District.

Cultural Perspectives in Spanish

Hey 8th Grade Spanish Students!

Here’s some research guidance for you as you entice tourists to visit your country. Be sure to brainstorm and consider all the things that appeal to you when you travel. It is especially important that our information be from reliable and relevant sources, so we will be using the databases to which we subscribe through the Cobb Digital Library. Let’s get started!

Getting Started on Day 1

We will begin by researching in Cobb Digital Library‘s CultureGrams with Cultural Trivia Research

Additional resources in Cobb Digital Library recommended for this assignment are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember: You access Cobb Digital Library at home by using your Office 365 username and password (firstname.lastname@students.cobbk12.org) and your school computer password.

Presentation: Microsoft Sway

Introduction: What is Sway? (This video will be shared via direct instruction in class.)

How to Sway by TTIS, Whitney Prather (Here is a step-by-step how to if you need additional guidance while off campus. Direct Sway instruction will be provided in class by Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker. THIS VIDEO LIKES MICROSOFT EDGE!)

 

Helpful Hint: If you face obstacles or have questions while creating your Sway, be sure to utilize the Help feature within Sway.

 

 

 

Propaganda Museum Walk

Hey 6th grade Social Studies students! Put your thinking caps on because it’s time to think critically. You are invited along a Propaganda Museum Walk in the Digital Age Classroom where you will find groupings of World War II Propaganda borrowed from Cobb Digital Library’s Britannica Image Quest. Evaluate the examples identifying the tone and the representation of the subjects. Utilizing your understandings from the DBQ process, determine what the documents say, what they mean, and why they matter. Utilize your group members to facilitate discussion and evaluation of the primary source documents provided.

 

Use the Propaganda Museum Walk Guide, provided to you, as you evaluate the posters.

 

Propaganda Museum Walk Folder 

 

The above allows access to the shared folder on Microsoft Office 365 and includes the primary source documents utilized via the Propaganda Museum Walk.

POST LESSON REFLECTION

 

Poe Breakout: Under the Floorboards

Through collaborative instruction with Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and Media Paraprofessional, Mrs. Webb, Mrs. Dean’s and Mrs. Slade’s sixth grade AC Literature classes dove into Poe with Breakout EDU. In order to solve hidden clues, students were tasked with evaluating evidence and reading closely with a detective’s eye. Here are some images of their efforts.

Tales of Great Books: Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe

In honor of “The Master of Horror,” Edgar Allan Poe, the media center is collaborating with Reading and Language Arts teachers to help students better understand the impact Poe’s body of work (Do you know his writing spans a variety of genres?) has had on American Literature. Use Mrs. Baker’s Edgar Allan Poe Video Guide while viewing Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Great Books: Tales of Edgar Allan Poe , with an introduction by Mrs. Baker, to assist in your understanding of the major points within the video segment.

Teachers may also wish to utilize Great Books Tales of Edgar Allan Poe Teacher’s Guide provided by Georgia Public Broadcasting to help lead students through their individualized, grade level appropriate standards.

Also, be sure to take advantage of the myriad print and digital resources on Poe that are available in Durham’s Media Center. Many are currently featured on the “Spooky Books” display, but be sure to search Poe in Destiny to see all the super cool items available for check out.

 

Great Books: Tales of Edgar Allan Poe Discovery Education, 2003 . Full Video.
Discovery Education. Web. 27 October 2014. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com/>.

Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849). Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 23 Oct 2014.
http://quest.eb.com/#/search/134_1738103/1/134_1738103/cite

WANT MORE POE? Check out Thinkport for an abundance of awesome Poe resources including lesson plans, engaging activities, poetry readings, online field trips and so much more! Under “Interactive Media” click on “Knowing Poe,” or simply search “Poe” in the search box. Be sure to have plenty of time set aside to peruse this resource. You will get sucked in!

Do Ink with 7th Grade Science

Okay kiddos! You are now experts of the Human Body Systems. You have utilized resources in the Cobb Digital Library to learn all about the functions and the major organs that make up the Digestive, Circulatory, Nervous, Excretory, Respiratory, Skeletal, Muscular, and Immune Systems, and you have identified how they work together to create complex multi-cellular organisms. Now it’s time to pull all of that knowledge together and to present it to one another. YAY! And for that we will use the DoInk APP!

Before diving into the DoInk APP, let’s look at our requirments:

Accelerated Content Project Rubric

On-Level Project Rubric

There’s no limit to how A-W-E-S-O-M-E your project can be! For any and all questions, check out the Do Ink website. We will be getting started with the Do Ink Tutorials which can be found on the Do Ink website.

Here’s the Getting Started Checklist we will be using to ready us for the project creation. If you need additional support understanding the concept of a Storyboard, check out Vyond for a detailed explanation.

Ready, Set, Go!

7th Science: Human Body Systems

Hi 7th grade Scientists! Let’s use Cobb Digital Library to locate the BEST, most timely and relevant information on how organ systems interact to carry out life functions. Humans–and other complex multicellular organisms–have systems of organs that work together carrying out processes that keep us alive. Here’s how to get started using Cobb Digital Library to learn all about human body systems.

 

Science Databases are arranged in a group for quick access and include:

 

 

 

 

Helpful Hint: In BrainPOP, use the Make-a-Map Feature to create outlines of your notes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*All of the above resources feature content on Human Body Systems

Use this graphic organizer to assist you in note-taking.

This daily checklist will be turned in as your “Ticket Out the Door” at the end of each class period and will provide daily feedback regarding your progress. 

Science Standard:

S7L2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe how cell structures, cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems interact to maintain the basic needs of organisms.

c. Construct an argument that systems of the body (Cardiovascular, Excretory, Digestive, Respiratory, Muscular, Nervous, and Immune) interact with one another to carry out life processes.

(Clarification statement: The emphasis is not on learning individual structures and functions associated with each system, but on how systems interact to support life processes.)

Cite Your Sources!

Use the Citation Tool features in Gale’s Kid InfoBits and Gale in Context Middle School.

DK Findout and BrainPOP resources should be cited using www.citationmachine.net. Choose MLA format and follow the prompts.

Here is an example of a citation generated from the Digestive System resources in BrainPOP:

“Digestive System.” BrainPOP, 10 Oct. 2019, https://www.brainpop.com/health/bodysystems/digestivesystem/.

 

 

Cobb Digital Library (CDL) Access: On-campus computers, offer a shortcut on the desktop. From home, the link to CDL is available via both the Cobb County and Durham websites as well as through the Durham Library Learning Commongs blog. Students will be prompted to use their Office 365 username which follows this pattern: firstname.lastname@students.cobbk12.org. They will then use their individualized school computer password.

September in the Durham Library

Oh what a month it has been! September was fast and furious in the Durham Library as the 2019-20 school year picked up steam. Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Webb hosted Book Tasting with Mrs. Slade’s 6th grade ELA classes. Mrs. Baker taught collaboratively alongside Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Dean as 6th graders created Blackout Poems and wrote Inner Dialogues about their experience. Also, the library staff  hosted class book checkout and supported research lessons across grades and subject areas.

Check out some of the fun from the Book Tasting:

We Read Banned Books!

Throughout the month of September, the Durham Library celebrates Banned Books! This year Banned Books Week is September 22nd- 28th which happens to coincide with Fall Break. What a perfect time to celebrate the freedom of reading! Originating in 1982, this annual event, brings to light the importance of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which guarantees freedom of speech and freedom of the press by highlighting the benefits of free and open access to information and drawing attention to the harms of censorship. During September the Library is spotlighting books that have been recently banned or “challenged” somewhere in the United States. To learn more about the intellectual freedoms libraries strive to support, visit yours today!

Learn more about Banned Books Week by visiting the following resources:

American Library Association

Banned Books Week

The Durham Library celebrates free and open access to information.

Fall Break Reading Challenge

The Durham Media Center challenges you to read at least 20 minutes each day of spring break for a total of 180 minutes. Log your minutes in Biblionasium*.

If you need something good to read, be sure to visit the public library. Use your Library Pass to download ebooks or magazines from the Cobb County Public Library website. Durham Media Center’s online catalog Destiny is also available 24/7 and provides access to ebooks and audiobooks. It doesn’t stop there, Cobb Digital Library’s databases eBooks on EBSCOhost, Teen Book Cloud, and TumblePremium also provide digital resources. And new this year, is Sora! Download the app today for access to digital content from the Durham Library as well as the Cobb County Public Library–all from the same app. Start reading now!

*To access Biblionasium, go to Destiny, choose the menu (the 3 lines) in the upper left-hand corner, and select Biblionasium. For access, you must login with the same login you use to get on the school computer.

 

 

 

 

 

Log into the Cobb Digital Library (see link in the post above) for access to digital content.

Blackout Poetry

Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and 6th grade teachers Mrs. Dean and Mrs. Slade recently led 6th grade AC ELA through the creation of Blackout Poetry!  Students chose pages that spoke to them from stacks of discarded paperbacks. The books were far past their prime and were actually on their way to the dumpster, but new life was found!

Here’s the prep:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instruction was provided that included examples of Blackout Poetry some of which were from McEachern High School’s Advanced Content Art Class! Thanks to Media Specialist, Mrs.  Buckert for connecting Durham with them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples of Blackout Poetry from McEachern High School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next students shuffled out and began connecting with texts.

Here are the steps the students used to create their poetry.

Step 1
Gather the interesting words. 
Scan the page looking for words and phrases that jump out at you. BE PATIENT! This is the most challenging yet most important step. 

Circle those words lightly in pencil.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2
Determine what words to keep. 
Read through your list of circled words to see if you have a poem forming.  

Remember, we read from top to bottom and left to right, so the words need to be in that order.
Decide if you want to eliminate or add words. Do that now!  

 

Step 3
Refine word choice. 
Write your poem out (on notebook paper) and read it aloud to yourself to make sure it makes sense. 

Decide what you want the reader to understand or feel after having read their poem? 

 

Step 4
After circling the words, you can sketch (in pencil) a picture or design that fits with the theme or images of the poem. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5
Use a sharpie or flair pen to outline. 
Then, erase all the pencil marks.

Use markers, colored pencils, crayons, to complete your blackout poem. 

 

The final results are A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! Here are just a few of them:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the Blackout Poetry, the students reflected on their experience by writing inner dialogues.