Digital Citizenship and Internet Safety

Hi 6th Grade Reading Students!

Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and 6th grade counselor, Mrs. Crandall will be interrupting your regularly scheduled programming to discuss Digital Citizenship and Internet Safety. Your Reading class will be visiting the media center one day this week to learn about safe online posting, protecting our online privacy, and cyberbullying so that we can stay safe online and be responsible digital citizens. We know we are successful when we can explain steps to take to stay safe online and to be responsible users of media. For an abundance of resources, including those utilized during the lesson, check out the media center’s tab above titled Digital Citizenship. Also know that your media specialist and counselors care about you and are here to be your online guides.

Digital Citizenship 4 Themes by Elk Grove Unified School District is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.


Be sure to give your Exit Tweet to Mrs. Baker or Mrs. Crandall before leaving today!

Banned Books Week

Mrs. Baker Reads Banned Books!

Mrs. Baker Reads Banned Books!

Did you know that the week of September 25th – October 1st is Banned Books Week?Banned Books Week is a celebration of the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which guarantees freedom of speech and freedom of the press. This annual event, which originated in 1982, highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship. The media center is currently spotlighting books that have been recently banned or “challenged” somewhere in the United States. To learn more about the intellectual freedoms media centers strive to support, visit yours today!

Learn more about Banned Books Week by visiting the following resources:

American Library Association

Banned Books Week

The Durham Media Center celebrates free and open access to information.

The Durham Media Center celebrates free and open access to information.

Digital Citizenship Museum Walk

Throughout May, Durham students will be guided by media specialist, Mrs. Baker and counselors, Mrs. Crandall, Mrs. Favors-Parks, and Mr. Wilson through a Digital Citizenship Museum Walk. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to control and mold their digital footprint so that it positively reflects their true character and helps them achieve long-term goals. They will also learn ways to heed caution when posting online, will review copyright and fair use laws and expectations, and will role-play and decode best practices as a youth in the digital age. As students approach a summer very likely filled with an overabundance of apps like Snapchat and Instagram, this will be a reminder from Durham to keep it safe online.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How will you safely navigate the digital world?

STATION 1:  Oversharing: Think Before You Post

Watch the Common Sense Media and Flocabulary video, and respond to the corresponding questions in the provided packet.

“Oversharing: Think Before You Post.” Common Sense Media. Flocabulary. Web. 4 May 2016.

Station 2: Copyright and Fair Use

Watch the Common Sense Media video, and respond to the corresponding questions in the provided packet.

“Copyright and Fair Use.” Common Sense Media. Web. 4 May 2016.

Utilize the provided resources at stations 3-6 to meet the objectives outlined in the Digital Citizenship Museum Walk packet.

6th Graders Utilize the New 21st Century Classroom

6th Graders Utilize the New 21st Century Classroom

8th Grade Drama Students Defy Stereotypes

Beginning Monday, February 22nd, Drama and Broadcast teacher Mrs. Zwolle and Media Specialist Mrs. Baker are teaming up to lead 8th grade Drama students through a study of stereotypes in an effort to gain understanding of the role stereotypes play in dramatic production. Mrs. Baker will guide students through a variety of  activities focusing on stereotypes present in society. Students will turn their reflection inward to explore how they might personally be typecast by others. In opposition to those labels, they will write poems titled Just Because with the goal of debunking their stereotype. Students will then use Vocaroo to record audio recitations of their poems which they will also turn into QR codes. Their efforts will be on display in the main hallway so that others may learn from their stories. Students will also perform their poems orally in class.

For daily activities, check out the PowerPoint utilized to gather the daily lessons: Defying Stereotypes PowerPoint

HEY CLASS! If you’d like to learn more about former UGA, and prospective NFL, football player Malcolm Mitchell, who himself defies stereotypes, check out the following additional resources: (F.Y.I. These videos filter through YouTube and will be blocked while on campus. Hopefully your learning and interest extend beyond our school walls.) Swing by the media center to chat with me about how remarkable this young man is.)

Malcolm Mitchell Speaks to Usher’s New Look Foundation

Malcolm Mitchell High School Highlights

Malcolm Mitchell UGA Freshman Highlights

NFL Combine Ranking 2016

Here are our final products on display in the main hallway:

IMG_1310 IMG_1309

Defying Stereotypes

Digital Citizenship & Internet Safety

Our Kids and Technology

Image borrowed from Microsoft Clipart

Image borrowed from Microsoft Clipart

Are you aware American teenagers (aged 13-18) spend nine hours a day using media, while “tweens” (aged 8-12) spend 6 hours a day using media, in addition to technology used for school work, according to a five year update by the non-profit group Common Sense Media? In a recent report by MSNBC, CEO and founder of Common Sense Media James Steyer shared with NBC News that “[k]ids spend more time with media and technology than they do with their parents, time in school, or any other thing. They are literally living in a 24/7 media and technology world” (NBC News 2015). This research also found that, despite teens’ beliefs that they are able to attend to several tasks simultaneously, i.e. do homework, listen to music, connect on social media etc., researchers at Stanford and Harvard have found their attempt in be ineffective explaining that “[i]t [media] gets in the way of [one’s] ability to concentrate and to synthesize information well” (NBC News 2015). This research study also noted that this overload of technology may well be hurting kids’ ability to communicate, as well as their ability to show intimacy and empathy and that schools can help students learn to “focus on the learning process” rather than encouraging their constant back and forth via devices. With this recommendation in mind, the Durham Media Center and Counseling departments are beginning a series of lessons to guide students through the murky waters of the digital world. Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and 8th Grade Counselor, Mrs. Favors-Parks will be visiting 8th grade students during the week of January 19th-22nd in their Reading, Origins or Spanish classes to begin a discussion regarding precautions they should employ to protect themselves online. The International Society for Technology in Education’s (ISTE) NETS Standards and resources from NetSmartz Workshop will be utilized during the lessons. In February, 6th grade counselor, Mrs. Crandall and 7th grade counselor, Mr. Wilson will will follow suit with their respective grades. Plans to teach additional lessons across grade levels based upon survey results and data analysis will follow in the spring . For an abundance of resources regarding media and technology , be sure to check out Common Sense Media and NetSmartz Workshop  and for even more resources, be sure to check out the links provided under the “Digital Citizenship” tab above.

Support for your Argument: Opposing Viewpoints in Context

Need support for your argument? Then Opposing Viewpoints in Context is the source for you! Mrs. Dean’s and Mrs. Miller’s 6th grade Reading students recently had the opportunity to partner with Mrs. Baker as they researched support for their claims regarding current issues of their choosing. Students were guided through utilizing this Cobb Digital Library database, but anyone can be advised of the basics by checking out the Opposing Viewpoints in Context Pathfinder. Need more help? Swing by the media center for a one-on-one consult with your media specialist, Mrs. Baker.

 

Defying Stereotypes

Drama and Broadcast teacher Mrs. Zwolle and Media Specialist Mrs. Baker recently teamed up to lead 8th grade Drama students through a study of stereotypes in an effort to gain understanding of the role stereotypes play in dramatic production. Mrs. Baker guided students through a variety of  activities focusing on stereotypes present in society. After several days of study, students began to  reflect upon how they might personally be typecast by others. In opposition to those labels, they wrote poems titled Just Because defying the prescribed stereotype they had identified. Then students used Vocaroo to record audio recitations of their poems which they turned into QR codes which are now displayed in the main hallway. Students also presented their poems orally in class. Below are a few snapshots of the students’ final products.

For daily activities, check out the PowerPoint utilized to gather the daily lessons: Defying Stereotypes 

Passers by can scan the QR codes to listen to the students reciting their poems.

Passers by can scan the QR codes to listen to the students reciting their poems.

Students' final products feature their personal poems that defy the stereotype that might be projected upon them by others.

Students’ final products feature their personal poems that defy the stereotype that might be projected upon them by others.

IMG_0872

Visit the main hallway to learn more Durham’s 8th grade Drama students.

 

Drama Students Defying Stereotypes

Drama and Broadcast teacher Mrs. Zwolle and Media Specialist Mrs. Baker recently teamed up to lead 8th grade Drama students through a study of stereotypes based upon ethnicity, gender, locality, and occupation in an effort to gain understanding of the role stereotypes play in dramatic production. Students reflected upon how they might personally be typecast within society. In opposition to those labels, they wrote poems modeling Latino feminist Ana Castillo’s “We Would Like You to Know” in which she dispels Latino prejudices. Students presented their poems in class, and then used Vocaroo to record audio recitations of their poems which they turned into QR codes. For additional resources on this lesson, check the related blog posts below.

Stereotypes in Drama

During the week of February 9th – 13th, Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Zwolle are teaming up for a collaborative lesson on stereotypes.

Below are some of the resources students will be utilizing throughout the week:

NBC News’ Report: Super Bowl Cheerleaders are Some of the Smartest in the Game

Stereotypes Examples borrowed from Microsoft Clip Art

Ana Castillo’s We Would Like You to Know

Latinos Youth  “We Would Like You to Know” Video

We Would Like You to Know-Student Poem

Drama Expert Groups

Image taken from Microsoft Clip Art

Image taken from Microsoft Clip Art

During the week of February 9th through February 13th, Mrs. Zwolle’s 4th period 8th grade Drama students will be partnering with the media center for a study of stereotypes and the role stereotypes play in theater production. In preparation for the lesson, a few select students will research and become experts on designated topics connected to the lesson beforehand. On Tuesday, February 3rd during 4th period, students will meet with Media Specialist Mrs. Baker who will further explain this exciting opportunity.

Attached: Expert Groups Assignments and Expert Groups Graphic Organizer

*Copies of the attached documents will be provided to selected students.