Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” with Mrs. Baker

Welcome to Mrs. Slades’ and Mrs. Dean’s 6th AC ELA!

It’s the most wonderful time of year . . . Halloween! There is no more perfect time to study Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.” To add to the spooky atmosphere, let’s watch this visual recitation of “The Raven” read by Christopher Lee and utilize my Raven Reading Guide to make certain we do not miss a single spooky detail. After we analyze the poem, let’s talk about what determines the tone and mood of the work. To better understand Mood and Tone, we will be utilizing several different resources including BrainPOP’s movie on Mood and Tone and this Mood vs. Tone graphic organizer.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: In poetry, how is mood and tone established?

Works Cited

The Raven (Christopher Lee). 24 June 2013, youtu.be/BefliMlEzZ8.

 

Edgar Allan Poe

EDGAR ALLEN POE
(1809-1849). American poet and short-story writer.

In honor of “The Master of Horror,” Edgar Allan Poe, the Durham Library Learning Commons is collaborating with Reading and Language Arts teachers to help students better understand the impact Poe’s body of work has had on American Literature. (Do you know his writing spans a variety of genres?)  Use Mrs. Baker’s Edgar Allan Poe Video Guide while viewing Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Great Books: Tales of Edgar Allan Poe , with an introduction by Mrs. Baker, to assist in your understanding of the major points within the video segment.

Teachers may utilize Great Books Tales of Edgar Allan Poe Teacher’s Guide provided by Georgia Public Broadcasting to help lead students through their individualized, grade level appropriate standards.

Also, be sure to take advantage of the myriad print and digital resources on Poe that are available in Durham’s Library Learning Commons. Many are currently featured on the “Spooky Books” display, but be sure to search Poe in Destiny to see all the super cool items available for check out.

 

Great Books: Tales of Edgar Allan Poe Discovery Education, 2003 . Full Video.
Discovery Education. Web. 27 October 2014. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com/>.

Portrait of Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849). Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 23 Oct 2014.
http://quest.eb.com/#/search/134_1738103/1/134_1738103/cite

WANT MORE POE? Check out Thinkport for an abundance of awesome Poe resources including lesson plans, engaging activities, poetry readings, online field trips and so much more! Under “Interactive Media” click on “Knowing Poe,” or simply search “Poe” in the search box. Be sure to have plenty of time set aside to peruse this resource. You will get sucked in!

7th ELA Argumentative Research

Okay, kids. Here’s the chance for your voices to be heard. Have an opinion? Let’s find out how to convince others to see issues just as we do by using research to support our perspectives. You have chosen an argumentative essay topic from the provided list. Here’s what you will need to do before starting the research.

  1. Look at the essay topic you have chosen.

  2. Break down the question. Identify the key words you will use to begin the research.

  3. Determine what information you will need in order to convince your audience to see the issue as you do.

  4. Use the ACADEMIC databases in the Cobb Digital Library (CDL) to support your claim.

And off we go . . .

The BEST CDL databases for this assignment are:

Gale in Context Middle School

Opposing Viewpoints in Context

 

 

Here are the steps to search within these databases:

Step 1: Adding to Favorites

Step 2: Basic Searches

 

Step 3: Highlighting and Notetaking

Step 4: Using the Citation Tool

Citing Sources:

  1. Cite every source from which you take notes.
  2. Use the Citation Tool to generate the citation in MLA format
  3. Copy and paste each citation into a Word document in Office 365. This information will be necessary for creating the Works Cited.

For more complex, multi-part search topics, use the Advanced Search Feature:

Continue locating relevant articles and taking notes within them until you have sufficient evidence to support your claim.

Sixth Social Studies: Canada and Australia Case Studies

Hey AC Sixth Graders! You are diving into case studies of Canada and Australia to determine how where you live affects how you live, and I’m excited to be your Cobb Digital Library guide. There are many Cobb Digital Library databases that will support research of countries. I recommend beginning with CultureGrams because it offers succinct information about the country’s background, people, customs & courtesies, lifestyle, and society. After you have built a foundation of understanding about your country, access additional databases to deepen your understanding. Remember to research with a sense of inquiry. What information interests and incites your curiosity? You’ve got this!

 

World Read Aloud Day, February 5, 2020

The Durham Library celebrates reading every day, but on Wednesday, February 5th, 2020, an extra special celebration will be taking place. Students from Mrs. Dean’s, Mrs. Slade’s, Mrs. Crook’s, Mrs. Gavin’s, Mrs. Hall’s, and Mrs. Hardin’s classes will be hearing readings of first book chapters of books from special guests including Durham teachers Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Slade, Mrs. Crook, Ms. Mullholland, Mrs. Zwolle, Ms. Garcia-Arrese, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Dillard and Mr. Brink  as well as Durham Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker, Library Media Paraprofessional, Mrs. Webb and Durham’s Administrative Team of Principal, Dr. Andy Bristow, and Assistant Principals, Mrs. Thorpe, and Mr. Fowler. Students will have the opportunity to rate the books based upon their interest. On the school days that follow, students will visit the Durham Library to check out the titles of their choosing. This special event will expose students to a variety of titles, authors, genres, and perspectives. To learn more about World Read Aloud Day and to advocate for literacy be sure to visit LitWorld and Scholastic.

* Officially registered event with LitWorld.org

Here you can find the books shared by the readers at First Chapter Friday.

They titles are also featured in the Destiny Collection First Chapter Friday.

Sora & Destiny

Welcome to Sora!

 

Mrs. Pettit’s, Mrs. Ragland’s, and Mrs. Salter’s eighth grade ELA students are getting a lesson from Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Webb on finding “just right books”using the Sora app which syncs digital content including ebooks and audiobooks from CCSD, Durham, and the Cobb County Public Library! Students will also utilize Collections in Destiny including “Mrs. Baker Recommends” and “Lexile 1000+” for guidance in choosing books they will enjoy. Lastly, the Dynamic duo of Baker and Webb will highlight books through Book Talks. For all the details, check out Mrs. Baker’s Sora and Destiny presentation and for support onboarding with Sora, be sure to check out the Sora Login Screenshots.

Learning Targets

December in the Durham Library

December was quite a bustling month filled with an abundance of learning and festivity. The Library was decked out and full of holiday spirit. Seasonal books were on display, and students even visited for fireside readings with Mrs. Baker as well as double-entry journal lessons featuring picture books. For the first time, the Library hosted a December Scholastic Book Fair and students were able to stockpile books in preparation for the annual Season’s Readings Challenge with the promise of an impending celebration upon their return in January. Check out the month’s highlights in the featured infographic below.

Double-Entry Journals: The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Hi Kiddos! It’s time to hit the books and to make personal connections with the text using a strategy called the Double-Entry Journal. We will be reading the picture book The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin by Julia Finley Mosca.

Here’s a preview of the book:

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures 

Here’s what we need to know about using the strategy of a Double-Entry Journal. (Mrs. Baker will guide you through this resource.) 

We will be using a Double-Entry Journal to evaluate the text of The Girl Who Thought in Pictures

Works Cited

Time, Sami & Amro Reading. “The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin | READ ALOUD PICTURE BOOK |.” YouTube, YouTube, 15 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPj0SaapJMs&t=15s.

Poe Breakout: Under the Floorboards

Through collaborative instruction with Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and Media Paraprofessional, Mrs. Webb, Mrs. Dean’s and Mrs. Slade’s sixth grade AC Literature classes dove into Poe with Breakout EDU. In order to solve hidden clues, students were tasked with evaluating evidence and reading closely with a detective’s eye. Here are some images of their efforts.

Blackout Poetry

Media Specialist, Mrs. Baker and 6th grade teachers Mrs. Dean and Mrs. Slade recently led 6th grade AC ELA through the creation of Blackout Poetry!  Students chose pages that spoke to them from stacks of discarded paperbacks. The books were far past their prime and were actually on their way to the dumpster, but new life was found!

Here’s the prep:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instruction was provided that included examples of Blackout Poetry some of which were from McEachern High School’s Advanced Content Art Class! Thanks to Media Specialist, Mrs.  Buckert for connecting Durham with them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples of Blackout Poetry from McEachern High School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next students shuffled out and began connecting with texts.

Here are the steps the students used to create their poetry.

Step 1
Gather the interesting words. 
Scan the page looking for words and phrases that jump out at you. BE PATIENT! This is the most challenging yet most important step. 

Circle those words lightly in pencil.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2
Determine what words to keep. 
Read through your list of circled words to see if you have a poem forming.  

Remember, we read from top to bottom and left to right, so the words need to be in that order.
Decide if you want to eliminate or add words. Do that now!  

 

Step 3
Refine word choice. 
Write your poem out (on notebook paper) and read it aloud to yourself to make sure it makes sense. 

Decide what you want the reader to understand or feel after having read their poem? 

 

Step 4
After circling the words, you can sketch (in pencil) a picture or design that fits with the theme or images of the poem. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5
Use a sharpie or flair pen to outline. 
Then, erase all the pencil marks.

Use markers, colored pencils, crayons, to complete your blackout poem. 

 

The final results are A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! Here are just a few of them:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the Blackout Poetry, the students reflected on their experience by writing inner dialogues.