This week’s board work…just in case you missed it.

1. Warm-Up:
Review: What is a symbiotic relationship?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Organisms can be classified as being either prokaryote or eukaryote.
3. Work Session:
Data Dig
Direct Instruction: Cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm
Vocabulary worksheet
4. Closing:
Summary – What is the difference between prokaryote and eukaryote?
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Summarize the video/lecture on nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane.

1. Warm-Up:
Review: What are the 3 types of symbiotic relationships?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Prokaryotic cells are single-celled organisms that do not have a nucleus or any membrane-bound organelles.
3. Work Session:
Direct Instruction: Cell wall, chloroplast, lysosome, mitochondria
4. Closing:
Summary – Why do cells NEED to take in nutrients?
*Brain Pop Cells*
*BYOD letters
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Describe the water cycle.

1. Warm-Up:
What is parasitism?
2. Opening:
Study notes: A cell is the smallest unit that can carry out life processes.
3. Work Session:
Vocabulary Matching (include 1st 9 week vocabulary)
4. Closing:
Are cell parts (organelles) interdependent? Why or why not?
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Describe the importance of the nitrogen cycle.

1. Warm-Up:
What is commensalism?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cells are made up of smaller parts called organelles.
3. Work Session:
Making a study guide.
4. Closing:
How do plant cells differ from animal cells?
Vocabulary:
organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Study for your test.

1. Warm-up:
Reading Leap Article
2. Opening:
LEAP writing.
3. Work Session:
TEST
*Retest*
4. Closing:
Describe the 3 types of symbiotic relationships we did this week.
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework: Look at the blog for notes.

Cell Study Guide

Both animal and plant cells have some similar structural elements. First off they are both eukaryotic, which means they have a defined nucleus. The nucleus contains chromosomes. It is protected and surrounded by the cytoplasm, which is a watery or gel-like liquid. Further, animal and plant cells have a cell membrane that surrounds the cell. This allows for the cell to exert control, in most cases, over what can penetrate the cell, and what cannot.
One of the primary differences between animal and plant cells is that plant cells have a cell wall made up of cellulose. This helps the plant cells to allow high pressure to build inside of it, without bursting. A plant cell has to be able to accept large amounts of liquid through osmosis, without being destroyed. An animal cell does not have this cell wall. If you start to fill the animal cell with too much distilled water or other fluid, it will eventually pop.
Plant cells also are different from animal cells because they use photosynthesis to covert sunlight into needed food for the plant. Plant cells have chloroplasts, which has its own DNA, essentially directing the work of the chloroplasts.
Also plant cells, if one could view them under the microscope, appear extremely different than an animal cell because of the presence of a large vacuole, which exists in the cell’s cytoplasm. It usually takes up most of the room in the cell, and the membrane of the cell encircles it. It contains waste materials, water, and nutrients that can be used or secreted as necessary.
Animal cells have small vacuoles and may have numerous ones. They never have the large single vacuole that takes up most of the space in plant cells. As well, under the microscope plant cells often have a more regular shape. Animal cells tend to vary greatly in appearance.
Animals cells and plant cells have many similarites and many differences. In both plants and animals, cells form the building blocks for the parts of the organisms from lungs, heart, petals, stems and every other part. They all have a nucleus which dictates the role of the cell, its function and carries the genetic code. The function of each cell depends on which parts of the genetic code are ‘switched’ on in both plant and animals cells.

However, there are differences, the primary one being that plant cells have cell walls. In animal cells, the cells themselves play little part in prividing supportive structure for the organsims. This is carried out by structures like bones, exoskeletons and specific structural parts created by cells. In plants, however, the cells themselves are important in maintaining the structure.
Each plant cell is surrounded by a rigid cell wall. This is made from a material called cellulose which is starch based and forms a rigid structure. To use this rigidity, the plant cells have a liquid called sap inside their cellular space or vacuole. When this is full of as much water as it can absorb, it pushes outwards, placing pressure on the cell wall and keeping the cell in its turgid shape. This is called turgidity. In animal cells there is no need for a cell wall but animal cells and plant cells both have cell membranes.
In a plant, the cell membrane is used in a specific way. It is selective or semi-permeable. This simply means that, due to its chemistry, it allows some particles in (like water and dissolved glucose) while keeping others out (like certain toxins). This means that a plant cell can keep absorbing water until the concentration of water on both sides of the membrane is equal and sometimes beyond that, which results in them being able to obtain nutrients dissolved in the water because plants only take nutrients in in solution.
Plant cells also have organelles within them. These can be of different ypes and include chloroplasts – where pigments for photosynthesis are stored and mitochondria – which are the powerhouses of the cell and oxidise food substances to release energy. In the chloroplasts are the grana and stroma in which the different stages of photosynthesis occur (the dark and light phases), animal cells do not need these organelles because they take in nutrients directly from surrounding fluid – the animal takes them in orally.
So plant cells and animal cells have much in common but due to their different roles within the organisms they have definite differences too.

Credit Recovery Policy

Our credit recovery policy is as follows:

* Late work: For every day an assignment is late, I will deduct 5 points from the assignment grade. They have 5 days to turn it in. After the 5th day, the student will receive a zero for the assignment.

* Grade recovery will be permitted on Summative assessments only. The purpose of grade recovery is to give the student the opportunity to show that he/she has mastered the standard of the course. The following rules will apply for this process:
* To be eligible to take the retest, students must complete a process of remediation, including
including, but not limited to, Saturday school, before and/or after-school tutoring, test
analysis, or online remediation (go.hrw.com, Brain Pop, iXL Science, etc.). The method of
remediation will be determined by the teacher. Only ONE retest is permitted per summative
assessment. The retest will not be the original test.

* Students who are absent when an assignment is given will have the same number of days missed to make up any missed work (absent 1 day = 1 day to make up the missed work).

* Retests and/or late/missing work will not be accepted after 5 days PRIOR to the end of the grading period.

* It is the STUDENT’S responsibility to request and follow through with making up any and all missing/late work. It is not the teacher’s responsibility.

I hope this will ease the minds of my students and parents. 🙂

This week’s plans

1. Warm-Up:
Why is each part of the cell essential to survival?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cell structures (organelles) are directly related to cell functions.
3. Work Session:
Data Dig
Direct Instruction
Cell Bingo
4. Closing:
Summary – topic: “Dear parent/guardian…today I learned…” (Bonus points if your parents sign).
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Summarize the characteristics of the deciduous forest biome (vegetation, climate, animals, temps, etc.).

1. Warm-Up:
How do you explain the relationship between the structures and functions of the cell organelles?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cell take in nutrients to grow, divide, and make needed material.
3. Work Session:
Graphing water in the cell (pie and bar).
Cells to health issues.
*Draw attention to the fact that cells are 90 % water.*
4. Closing:
Summary – Today I learned… (Bonus if a teacher signs).
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Summarize the characteristics of the grassland biome (vegetation, climate, animals, temp, etc.).

1. Warm-Up:
Can plant and animal cells function without sunlight? Why or why not?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cell structure is directly related to cell function due to each organelles job.
3. Work Session:
Open discussion: Why must cells take in nutrients?
How does that relate to you?
What is the importance of cell division?
Cell Model drawing.
4. Closing:
Write an entry in your notebook about 3 organelles and their functions.
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Summarize the characteristics of the taiga (coniferous forest) biome (vegetation, climate, animals, temp, etc.).

1. Warm-Up:
Finish cell model drawing.
2. Opening:
Study notes: A cell is the smallest unit that is able to carry out all life processes. Cells are made of smaller parts called organelles, each having its own function within the cell.
3. Work Session:
Cellular CSI
4. Closing:
Q&A
Vocabulary:
organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell, DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:

1. Warm-up:
Reading Leap Article
2. Opening:
LEAP writing.
3. Work Session:
Cellular CSI trials.
4. Closing:
Formative writing prompt:
What happens if we remove one organism from the biosphere? Give an example and explain the impact its extinction would have on other organisms. Minimum 2 paragraphs.

Early Release, Saturday School, Tutoring, Credit Recovery

Don’t forget we will be releasing early for conferences next week (Oct. 16 – Oct. 20). If you don’t have a conference scheduled and would like one, please email me [email protected] . You will conference with your homeroom teacher. We can also set up conferences for a later time if you can’t make the scheduled times. We can also set up phone conferences, if needed.

I will be giving Saturday School invitations as well as Credit Recovery packets on Monday. I will also begin tutoring on Tuesday mornings if requested. Please let me know so I can plan accordingly.

What’s Up

Monday:
1. Warm-up:
Why do we need to know about cells?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cells take in nutrients to grow, divide, and make needed material.
3. Work Session:
Data Dig
KWL Chart: What do I know about the cell?
Interactive Lab
4. Closing:
Summary – topic: What I know about cells.
Vocabulary: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell
Homework:
Summarize the characteristics of the desert biome (vegetation, climate, animals, temps, etc.).

Tuesday:
1. Warm-Up:
What are cells?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cell structure are related to cell functions.
3. Work Session:
Graphing water in the cell (pie and bar).
Cells to health issues.
*Draw attention to the fact that cells are 90 % water.*
4. Closing:
Summary – Today I learned…
Vocabulary: DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome
Homework:
Summarize the characteristics of the rainforest biome (vegetation, climate, animals, temp, etc.).

Wednesday:
1. Warm-Up:
What do cells tell us about basic processes of life…life, death, reproduction, etc.?
2. Opening:
Study notes: Cells have processes that allow them to obtain needed materials to repair injuries, grow, and divide.
3. Work Session:
Group: Jigsaw on cell organelles. (Presenting tomorrow).
Open discussion: Why must cells take in nutrients?
How does that relate to you?
What is the importance of cell division?
4. Closing:
Create a graphic organizer in your notebook to summarize what you learned. (Complete for homework if you don’t finish in class).
Vocabulary: DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome, ribosome, endoplasmic reticulum, vacuole, golgi body (complex)
Homework: STUDY!!

Thursday:
1. Warm-Up:
How do you explain the relationship between the structures and functions of cell organelles?
2. Opening:
Study notes: A cell is the smallest unit that is able to carry out all life processes. Cells are made of smaller parts called organelles, each having its own function within the cell.
3. Work Session:
Create your visual.
Expert presentations on the organelle.
4. Closing:
Q&A
Vocabulary: DNA, nucleus, cytoplasm, cell wall, cell membrane, mitochondria, chloroplast, lysosome, ribosome, endoplasmic reticulum, vacuole, golgi body (complex)
Homework:
STUDY!!!

Friday:
1. Warm-up:
Reading Leap Article
2. Opening:
LEAP writing.
3. Work Session:
TEST OUT (reds and blues)
Organelle Quiz (cell wall, cell membrane, lysosomes, ribosome, golgi body (complex), nucleus, mitochondria, DNA, cytoplasm, chloroplast, vacuole
Constructed response topic:
What happens if we remove one organism from the biosphere? Give an example and explain the impact its extinction would have on other organisms and the environment. Minimum 2 paragraphs.

Due this week…

Yaaaahhhh….we are moving on! Some of you have some work to do to fix the information about the biomes but I’m sure you have already done that. Remember that studying for this class is a requirement.

You need to bring some things to class….hand sanitizer, color pencils or crayons, and glue sticks. You have to bring this to class this week because you will need them as we move through cells. You will need these art supplies for the remainder of the year. Please make sure you have those.

You will need to access the book using the password I gave. My EL students, you will need to listen to the assigned sections in Spanish if reading it in English is difficult for you. My English readers, you will need to listen to the book in English to help reinforce the content we are covering.

We will be making a Venn Diagram in class and it will serve as a Formative. Your Brain Pop will also serve as a Formative. Your vocabulary quiz will serve as a Formative as well. That’s 3 grades this week. We may include the summaries in that since that is an easy grade for you.

You will be taking some notes this week so be prepared. I will talk to you about the BYOD stuff this week. 🙂

Homework:
Due Wednesday…Red group you owe me “Biomes Graphic Organizer” and “Brain Pop Quiz: Cells.”
Blue and Green group you owe me “Brain Pop Quiz: Cells.”

You will be writing summaries this week. Also, be thinking about the topic you want to read about this week for our LEAP activity. I’ll put them in a hat and draw one out.

Quiz:
Friday is the vocabulary quiz. Your vocabulary terms are: organism, prokaryote, eukaryote, organelle, cell. It will also include a writing response to the following question: “How are plant cells different than animal cells?”

It is CRITICAL that you have your notebook on point. Make sure you have your Table of Contents, the page numbers, the warm-up question as your title, etc. Remember, you must answer the warm up everyday. The routine should be easy for you as we have been doing this for 9 weeks. I’m sure you will get the notebook correct even if that means you need to get a new one. Remember, You are responsible for You. 🙂

Have a happy week and remember, if you have any questions please email me… [email protected]

Upcoming Unit

Our science class will soon begin exploring a unit on the structure and function of cells. In this unit, students will learn about the working parts of cells and how these parts perform functions for obtaining nutrients in order to grow, reproduce, make needed materials, and process wastes. By the end of the chapter, students should demonstrate a clear understanding of and discuss the following topics:
1. Cell Structure and Function
• There are two basic types of cells;
o Prokaryotic cells do not have a nucleus. (bacteria)
o Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus. (plant and animal cells)
• Eukaryotic cells are made up of smaller parts called organelles, each having its own function within the cell. The major organelles with which students should be familiar are the cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and lysosome.
2. Cell Processes
• Diffusion is the movement of small particles such as oxygen and carbon dioxide across the cell membrane without the use of energy.
• Osmosis is the movement of water across a cell membrane without using energy.
• Active transport moves larger particles across the cell membrane and requires the use of energy. Endocytosis and exocytosis are examples of active transport.
• Photosynthesis is the process that plants use to sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water to make food in the form of the simple carbohydrate, glucose. Photosynthesis also produces oxygen. Photosynthesis occurs in a chloroplasts of plant cells.
• Cellular Respiration is the process that plants and animals use oxygen and glucose to produce energy in the form of ATP. Cellular respiration also produces carbon dioxide and water. Cellular respiration occurs in the mitochondria of plant and animal cells.
• Most cells reproduce in a process called Mitosis.

The Study Guide

Don’t forget to get your Study Guide filled in by Thursday. Your test is Friday so Thursday is the last day to work on it. Many are finished and thank you for your hard work. It will pay off when you ACE the test Friday.

Don’t forget your Brain Pop quizzes.

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