LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW!

I hope everyone enjoyed a few extra hours and a day SNOW-CATION!  I know at my house we enjoyed a nice fire and snuggle/NETFLIX time.  Hope you were safe and I’m excited to be back.  With our YEAR dwindling down (**6 DAYS until CHRISTMAS BREAK!!) we are hard at work for our Science EARTH Layers, Tetonic Plates, and Mid-Ocean Ridges to be finalized.

 

Resources for Plate Tectonics:

Science Monster Interactive

Earthquakes Studyjams

Volcanoes Studyjams

Mountain Maker, Earth Shaker

Intro to plate tectonics

Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes

Plate Tectonics Further Evidence

Continental Drift, What’s the Big Idea?

Lava Lake Tectonics

Life on Fire: Tectonic Volcanoes

Earthquake Simulator

How do Glaciers Shape the land?

Earthquake and Volcano Epicenters

Geologic Evidence for Pangaea

Fossil Dating

Determining Earthquake Epicenters

Sixth Grade:

More Pangaea! Watch these animations:

Animation 1

Animation 2

Animation 3

Illustration of fossil evidence: Rejoined Continents

What is a fossil?

Building Pangaea Gizmo

BACK from BREAK!

I hope this blog entry finds you well and rested!  I have been in NOLA with National Science Teachers’ Association, and I learned a lot!!  We’ve been learning all around the EARTH layers and compositions.  temperatures, density, and all the additional vocabulary that goes with it….

CHECK out these websites for more info!!

 

https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/582d10e481d8bd7c77cb8222

 

https://quizlet.com/9809942/earths-compositional-physical-layers-flash-cards/

 

https://www.windows2universe.org/?page=/earth/interior/earths_crust.html

U2L3 Earth Layers quiz-22ltb9n

layers of Earth Study Guide-uuf574

 

EARTH Layers RESOURCES over BREAK!!!

Students will be working on the layers of Earth models using paper plates. If students finish, they can work on MobyMax or Legends of Learning assignments that I have activated.

Students need to know the following:

The layers of Earth from hottest to coldest: inner core, outer core, mantle, crust

The layers of Earth from coldest to hottest: crust, mantle, outer core, inner core

The layers of Earth from least dense to most dense: crust, mantle, outer core, inner core

The layers of Earth from thinnest to thickest: crust, inner core, outer core, mantle

 

We have started studying Layers of the Earth!

  1. Learning Targets, Vocabulary and StandardsLayersofEarthVocab-17vlp8a
  2. LayersOfEarthData-Students filled in this chart with the data found here
  3. Layers of Earth Paper Plate Model–Students use a 9 inch paper plate to model the layers of earth to scale.
  4. Video: Brainpop: Structure of Earth
  5. Video: Flocabulary Layers of Earth
  6. Video: Bill Nye Earth’s Crust
  7. Video: Layers of the Earth for Kids
  8. Sim: Earth Layers Simulation
  9. Lesson: Earth Layers

Resources for Plate Tectonics:

Science Monster Interactive

Earthquakes Studyjams

Volcanoes Studyjams

Mountain Maker, Earth Shaker

Intro to plate tectonics

Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes

Plate Tectonics Further Evidence

Continental Drift, What’s the Big Idea?

Lava Lake Tectonics

Life on Fire: Tectonic Volcanoes

Earthquake Simulator

How do Glaciers Shape the land?

Earthquake and Volcano Epicenters

Geologic Evidence for Pangaea

Fossil Dating

Determining Earthquake Epicenters

More Pangaea! Watch these animations:

Animation 1

Animation 2

Animation 3

Illustration of fossil evidence: Rejoined Continents

What is a fossil?

On Monday, students will fill in notes and watched a bunch of video clips illustrating different types of plate boundaries. The filled-in worksheet can be found here:Types of Boundary chart –filled in

 

Tuesday: Students will complete the convection currents activity found here: Modeling Convection Currents Lab 

 

:Also, students will fill in notes and watched a bunch of video clips illustrating different types of plate boundaries. The filled-in worksheet can be found here:Types of Boundary chart –filled in

On Tuesday: Students will complete the snack tectonics lab!

Background Information for Parents- Earth’s Layers and Plate Tectonics~

Background Information for Parents- Earth’s Layers and Plate Tectonics

 

 

  1. Earth’s Layers

The Earth is composed of three distinct layers: crust, mantle, and core. Each of these layers is

easily identified from the other on the basis of temperature, density and composition.

 

  • The Crust

The outermost layer of the Earth is the crust. Depending on location, the crust ranges from 5 – 60 kilometers in depth. There are two types of crust—thinner and more dense oceanic crust and thicker and less dense continental crust.

 

  • The Mantle

The next layer of the Earth, the mantle, is the largest layer of the Earth. It is 2900 km in depth, making it the thickest layer. Sixty-seven percent of the Earth’s mass is located in the mantle. The mantle is a solid layer which has temperatures as high as 2800º F, and is denser than the crust.

 

  • The Core

The innermost layer of the Earth is known as the core. It is the densest and most hot layer of the Earth. Geologists believe the Earth’s core is made mostly of iron with smaller amounts of nickel. The core is divided into two parts—the outer core and the inner core. The inner core—the center of Earth – is solid due to high amounts of pressure. The outer core is liquid and consists mainly of iron, some nickel, and about ten percent sulphur and oxygen. The outer core and inner core together are responsible for the processes that produce Earth’s magnetism.

 

  1. Plate Tectonics

Earth’s plates move relative to one another as they “float” on the asthenosphere. The plates move because of convection currents in the mantle. As the mantle heats up near the core, molten rock becomes less dense, rising towards the top of the mantle, where it cools, becomes more dense, and sinks again. The convection current drags the plates along, causing them to separate at some plate boundaries and converge at others. The average rates of motion range from less than 1 cm to more than 15 cm per year. Nearly all the world’s earthquake and volcanic activity occurs along or near boundaries between the plates.

The development of the theory of plate tectonics began in 1912 when Alfred Wegener proposed his theory of continental drift. He suggested that the continents were once all attached in a single landmass he called Pangaea (Greek for ‘all earth’). Over time, this mass broke apart and drifted to separate places on the globe. Evidence to support this included the shape of the continents, the existence of similar fossils on different continents, matching rock types and geologic structures and proof of ancient climate patterns. Wegener’s ideas were very controversial because he didn’t have an explanation for how or why the continents moved. As a result, few people accepted his views and his theory was discounted. In 1960 Harry Hess used evidence he found, along with the work of other scientists, to propose that the movement of the continents was the result of the sea floor spreading. In 1962, he proposed the mechanism to account for Wegener’s moving continents: convection currents in the mantle.

III. Plate Boundaries

There are three types of plate boundaries found at the edge of the plates:

  • divergent
  • convergent
  • transform

 

A divergent boundary, also known as a rift zone, occurs where two plates are moving away from each other. As the two plates part, mid-ocean ridges are created as magma wells up through the cracks and cools to form new crust. As the plates move, the ocean basin expands and a ridge system of mountains is created. Divergent boundaries are responsible for the motion driving the plates.

 

A convergent boundary is where two plates come together. There are two types of convergent boundaries. A subduction zone occurs when a denser oceanic crust converges with and sinks under less dense continental crust. Subduction zones are the location of very strong earthquakes and volcanic activity. The ‘Ring of Fire’ around the margins of the Pacific Ocean is due to the subduction zones found at the edges of the Pacific plate. When there is a convergent boundary between two continental plates we call this a buckling zone. The two continental plates push into each other and create a high mountain range. The Himalayas in India are the result of the Indo-Australian and the Eurasian plates colliding head on.

 

A transform boundary (or zone) occurs where two plates slide past each other. The San Andreas fault in California is a transform boundary where the North American and Pacific plates are moving past each other. Earthquakes occur as a result of the accumulation and subsequent release of energy as the plates slide past each other.

 

 

WE are OUT OF SCHOOL, Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Hello fellow Scientist!  We are out of school Tuesday due to voting.  Each of you will be out and be able to relax and recoup one extra day.  Hope all is well with each of you, please check out my Lesson Plan tab to see what we’re doing in class.  We LOVED having Diamond Del on Friday for our Field Trip! Ask your students about their experience..  🙂

 

We  had the Unit 2 Almost there last week, we will be having the Unit Test on Thursday of this week to end our Geology Unit and begin our “Hydrology Unit”…  thank you for all you do!!

 

Ms. Hutchison

 

UNIT 2 Studies!!!

Background Information for Parents- Weathering, Erosion, and Deposition

and Soil

 

 

Weathering

Weathering is the process by which rock materials are broken down into smaller pieces by chemical or physical processes. Chemical weathering is caused by water (weakening bonds in minerals), weak acids (acid precipitation, acids in groundwater causing caves), and air (through oxidation). Physical weathering, also called mechanical weathering, occurs several ways. Water expands when it freezes; when water gets into cracks in rocks and then freezes and expands, pieces of the rock can crack off. Another way that rock cracks can be expanded and broken apart is when plant roots grow into them. Rock can also be weathered through abrasion—other rocks or sand particles hitting against the rock. This can occur in a river, as pebbles and rocks flow with the water, hitting other rocks in their path, or in the open, such as when rock faces get blasted by sand carried by the wind. Even gravity can cause abrasion, such as when a rockslide occurs down a slope. Even animals can cause weathering—such as when earthworms burrow in soil, further breaking apart particles.

 

Weathering usually takes a long time, but several factors can cause the speed to vary. For example, softer rocks like sandstone weather more quickly than harder rocks like granite. Rocks that have more surface area exposed to weathering agents will also weather more quickly. Even climate can affect rates of weathering; rocks will weather more quickly in hot, humid climates than in cold, dry ones.

 

Erosion

Erosion is the process of moving particles of rock from one place to another. Erosion can happen quickly or slowly, especially when caused by gravity. Rapid mass movements such as landslides, rockfalls, and lahars (volcanic mudslides) all happen very quickly. A type of slow mass movement is called creep—when a hillside gradually moves downslope due to water or plant roots. Water, wind, and ice are major factors that cause erosion. Waves and rivers carry weathered sediments from coastlines and river banks, changing their shape in the process. Wind picks up loose rocks and sand and carries them away. Sand dunes change shape as a result. Ice, usually in the form of glaciers moving over land, scrape and move rocks underneath then.

 

Deposition

Deposition occurs when rock fragments and sediments and laid down, or deposited. Deposits can occur in water or on land. Deposits in water include deltas, which occur when rivers slow down when entering a larger body of water like a sea or ocean, and barrier islands and beaches. In rivers, deposits form in river bends, where the water slows down. Land-based deposits include floodplains (caused by rivers),   loess (a fine layer of sediment deposited by wind) and dunes. Glacial deposits include moraines (rock deposits at the front and side of glaciers) and outwash plains (broader deposits in front of the glacier).

 

Soil Formation

Soil is more than mud pies and sand castles. It is the very source of life on which we build our existence. The type of soil in your area can determine if you live in poverty or prosperity. Soil is composed of four main things: weathered rocks, air, water, and organic material. Different soil types are based on the rock from which they weather. Soils form in layers, with bedrock being the rock layer beneath soil. Sometimes the bedrock is the parent rock that weather to form the soil, other times, the weathered rock and eroded and deposited over a layer of bedrock. Because of the way soil forms, soil often ends up in a series of layers, with humus-rich soil on top, sediment below that, and bedrock on the bottom. Geologists call these layers horizons. The uppermost layer is called topsoil and is important for planet growth. Topsoil contains humus, organic material in the soil made from the remains of plants and animals. Humus is important for adding nutrients to the soil. Soils without a rich layer of topsoil are not productive for plant growth.

soil_horizons_go-151eoft

Because soils are made of different types and sizes of particles, they vary in their consistency, which affects how much water they allow to pass through and how easy they are to break apart. For example, loams have a high percentage of sand in them, which allows water to infiltrate easily, whereas soils high in clay content do not allow water to infiltrate easily.

 

 

 

 

6th Grade SCIENCE conference WEEK

HUTCH Science

6th Grade SCIENCE conference WEEK

Greetings parents and family,

Conference week at Garrett Middle is the week of, October 16th-October 20th. The conference week signupGenius is designed to be an efficient way for parents to request a conference with your scholar’s teachers. The first conference will begin at 1:45p.m. and the last conference will begin at 4:15p.m., daily.  Each conference will last for 15 minutes with a 2 minute transition time. Parents we ask that you make your appointments, no later than, 12:00p.m. the day of your appointment.

If you would like to meet with me during conference week, please click the following link to sign up:

 www.SignUpGenius.com/go/4090F4FACAC2FA6F58-6thgrade

You may also visit other teacher’s websites to access their link to sign up for conferences with them as well. Please feel free to contact me if you have any other questions or concerns. Look forward to meeting you all during conference week!

CONFERENCE week ~ NEXT WEEK!!

Hello all!!  We will be on early release schedule, Thursday, October 12, 2017 @ 1:30 pm for Garrett Middle School.  Starting next Monday, October 16, 2017 – Friday, October 20, 2017, students will dismiss at 1:30pm and Parent/Teacher conferences will begin.  PLEASE sign up, if you need a conference with the teachers you need to see.

 

This week, we are finishing up on Weathering & Erosion and beginning Soil…  it’s an exciting “project based” time.  We will be doing a lot of fun things in Science, ask your student about the VOLCANO experiment!!!  FUNNNNN waiting to be HAD!

Check out my lesson plan bookmark, it’s full of excitement!  Happy Tuesday and have a BLESSED week!

PARENT TEACHER CONFERENCE SIGN UP:: 

http://www.SignUpGenius.com/go/4090F4FACAC2FA6F58-6thgrade

 

Ms. Hutchison

🙂

 

FIRST complete week back AFTER Fall Break!

WE MADE IT!!  Full (Harvest) Moon and all!!!  This has been a very successful week for Science, we accomplished all that we intended to and then some…. 🙂  We are all set for the Weathering, Erosion & Soil part of our Unit 2, I believe the students are enjoying the beginning and seem to be anticipating getting a WONDERFUL start to being back.

I hope Fall Break was restful, kind and safe for everyone; glad to be back!!

 

Check out my lesson plans bookmark tab for our current activities in class & don’t forget to sign up for Parent Conferences, October 16 – 20, 2017!!!

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/4090F4FACAC2FA6F58-6thgrade

 

THANKS & Happy Fall Y’all!!

Ms. Hutchison

FALL BREAK (September 25-29, 2017)

Sixth Grade Unit 2 Parent Information-26r6npn

 

HELLO, my fellow 6th grade supporters!!  We are finished with our Rocks & Minerals Unit, and are beginning our Weather, Erosion & Soil Unit.  Above i have added a link to help know where we’re heading when we return from break.

 

REMINDER: We are ON FALL BREAK:   September 25 – 29, 2017!, NO SCHOOL!!  I’ll see you back at GMS on October 2, 12017.  ENJOY and be safe, please!!

 

Ms. HUTCH