English/Language Arts

November 13, 2017:

Mentor Sentence: This week’s mentor sentence is all about punctuation!  It contains an apostrophe, quotation marks, exclamation point, 2 periods (one at the end of the sentence and one to abbreviate “Mister”), plus 2 commas.  Wow!  The quiz this Friday will focus on different uses of punctuation.

Writing: Students have been working hard to plan out a great narrative using a story arc.  They took this plan and began drawing out a comic to help them think about details, characters, and the passing of time.  This week we are starting to write out our narratives based on our comics.

Reading: We kicked off book clubs last week with a bang!  Students will begin reading their novels this week.  The lessons will focus on various reading strategies: making connections, visualizing, making predictions and asking questions.  Ask your child what book they are reading and maybe you can follow along at home!


Mentor Sentences 

Every week your child is working on “Mentor Sentences” in Writing class.  This is an amazing and authentic way for students to study grammar through an author’s work.  This is how we will cover and master the Fifth grade Language standards this year.  A mentor sentence is deliberately picked out by teachers for the week from a text that students are familiar with.  Then every day students have a different activity to do with the sentence:

Monday: Students write down anything and everything they notice. The class discusses these “noticings” and the teacher points out the area of focus for the week.  This week we are focusing on commas.

Tuesday: Students label something within the sentence.  Right now we are working on labeling the subject and predicate.  Soon students will start labeling various parts of speech.

Wednesday: Students revise the sentence.  This is a favorite day!  Students have to add/change something in the sentence to make it “better” without changing the meaning.  We have great discussions on this day!

Thursday: Students imitate the sentence.  They use the style of the author and the focus of the week (currently commas) to write a brand new sentence.

Friday: Students take a weekly assessment.  They will have to edit two mistakes in the sentence and write a sentence using the weekly focus. Look for these with graded work in Thursday folders.

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Dear Parents,                                                                                                                                     August 1, 2017

Thanks for visiting the ELA page of the fifth grade blog!  We are so excited to dive deep into reading and writing this year.  We are currently launching our reading and writing workshops in class.

The goals of our reading launch unit are:

· Describe what Reader’s Workshops look and sound like and their responsibilities in each.

· Set up a Reader’s Notebook and articulate the purpose of each “tool” included and how to use them independently.

· Choose just right books as well as books in the grade 4-5 text complexity band.

· Compare and contrast literary and informational texts and explain why a text is a specific genre.

· Use the standards board to improve their learning as well as to measure progress toward learning targets.

· Perform a close reading of an independent text.

· Compare and contrast paraphrasing, summarizing, and retelling.

· Read with sufficient fluency to support comprehension.

· Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions; carry out assigned group roles.

 

The goals of our writing launch unit are:

· Develop a Writer’s Notebook, understand the purpose of this tool as well as how to use it independently.

· Use the standards board to improve their learning as well as to measure progress toward learning targets.

· Depict seven purposes for writing and produce an example of each.

· Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

· Draw on all writers know of previous work with narrative writing.

· Assess their work, review their options, and make decisions about what needs to be done.

· Tackle stories of personal significance and dramatize those stories.

· Step inside the shoes of the character (themselves at a different time and place).

 

Let us know if you have any questions or concerns!

Cassie Quesenberry and Shoner Johnson