Social Studies

PLEASE NOTE: The Reconstruction test has been MOVED to THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19.

Reconstruction Unit

We are beginning our Reconstruction unit on October 2, and the students will take their Reconstruction test on Thursday, October 12.  Study guides will come home on Thursday, October 5.  We will be discussing the following topics and standards:

“Is it possible to reconstruct an entire society?”

  • Was the North’s victory in the Civil War positive for everyone in America? (Monday, Oct. 2)
    • ELAGSE5RI1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
    • ELAGSE5RI2: Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
    • ELAGSE5RI3: Explain the relationships or interactions between two r more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
    • ELAGSE5RI4: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
    • ELAGSE5RI6: Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • How did reconstruction change life for African-Americans? (Tuesday, Oct. 3)
    • SS4H6.b – Explain the work of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (Freedmen’s Bureau).
    • SS4H6.c – Explain how slavery was replaced by sharecropping and how freed African Americans or Blacks were prevented from exercising their newly won rights.
    • SS4H6.d – Describe the effects of Jim Crow Laws and practices.
  • What lasting changes occurred in the economies of the northern and southern states during Reconstruction? (Wednesday, Oct. 4)
    • SS4H6.c – Explain how slavery was replaced by sharecropping and how freed African Americans or Blacks were prevented from exercising their newly won rights.
    • SS5G2.a – Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations between the end of the Civil War and 1900 and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas.
  • What are the rights and responsibilities of a citizen? (Thursday, Oct. 5)
    • SS5CG1.a – Explain the responsibilities of a citizen.
    • SS5CG1.b – Explain the concept of due process of law and describe how the U.S. Constitution protects a citizen’s rights by due process.
  • In what ways did the federal government seek to protect the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction?  How did the southern states respond to the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments? (Monday, October 9)
    • SS4H6.c – Explain how slavery was replaced by sharecropping and how freed African Americans or Blacks were prevented from exercising their newly won rights.
    • SS4H6.d – Describe the effects of Jim Crow Laws and practices.
    • SS5CG3.a – Explain how voting rights are protected by the 15th…amendment.
  • How and why are amendments added to the Constitution?
    • SS5CG2.a – Explain the amendment process outlined in the Constitution.
    • SS5CG2.b – Describe the purpose for the amendment process.

Civil War Study Guides

Civil War study guides are coming home today, Thursday, August 17, in Thursday folders.  Students are more than welcome to bring their Social Studies notebooks home to help them study, but they MUST bring their notebook back to school each day, as we will be adding new information until Wednesday of next week.  Our test will be on Thursday, August 24.

 

Here is a great video that we watched today in class to review!  A Kid Explains The Civil War

Grading Note

This year, we will be grading some assignments differently than others.  If an assignment is used for practice or to judge student progress, the grade will have a “P” beside it.  This is meant to show you and your student how they are progressing on the skills being assessed, but it will NOT go in the gradebook on Synergy.  Assignments that are meant to assess student mastery of skills and standards, and that WILL be put in the gradebook, will have a “G” beside them.  Hopefully this will help keep you and your student very up to date on how they are understanding the content, while also showing their best efforts in their final grades.

Friday in Content

Every Friday, students will be working on becoming informed citizens by reading current event articles.  We will also be practicing for the Milestones by answering a few multiple choice questions (3-5 at most) and completing a constructed response using the RACE strategy.  The second half of our Friday will be Genius Hour.  Genius Hour was started at Google as a way for their employees to explore their personal passions with company support.  Students will work on a personal passion project focused on making a difference in the world with teacher and school support.  Students who complete their Genius Hour projects before March 2018 will be eligible to enter CCSD’s KidTalk competition!  Check out http://www.geniushour.com/ for more information!

 

Week 2-4: The Civil War

We will spend 3 weeks discussing the causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.  Our timeline will be:

Week 2 (8/7-8/11) – Causes of the Civil War

Week 3 (8/14-8/18) – Important events and people of the Civil War

Week 4 (8/21-8/25) – Effects of the Civil War

****Civil War Post Test will be on THURSDAY, AUGUST 24. Study Guides will come home in Thursday folders on 8/17/17.

 

Throughout these weeks, we will also be working on a Document Based Question (DBQ) about the causes of the Civil War.  We will be investigating primary sources from the time period to identify 3 causes of the Civil War.

 

Quarter 1 Curriculum Map

Week 1: Setting the stage for Inquiry

  • Classroom procedures
  • Social Studies Launch Unit- introducing connecting themes and protocols

Weeks 2-4: When is change worth conflict?

The student will explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.  a. Identify Uncle Tom’s Cabin and John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, and explain how each of these events was related to the Civil War. b. Discuss how the issues of states’ rights and slavery increased tensions between the North and South. c. Identify major battles and campaigns: Fort Sumter, Gettysburg, the Atlanta Campaign, Sherman’s March to the Sea, and Appomattox Court House. d. Describe the roles of Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. e. Describe the effects of war on the North and South.

  • Introduce Document Based Questioning (DBQ)
  • Start Civil War DBQ What Caused the Civil War?
  • Events of the Civil War (Geography Standards on major battle locations)
  • Consequences of the Civil War

Week 5: How did Reconstruction affect life in the North and South?

The student will analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life. a. Describe the purpose of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. b. Explain the work of the Freedmen’s Bureau. c. Explain how slavery was replaced by sharecropping and how African-Americans were prevented from exercising their newly won rights; include a discussion of Jim Crow laws and customs.

  • 13th, 14th & 15th Amendments
  • Freedmen’s Bureau
  • Sharecropping
  • Emphasize SS5G2 Explain the reasons for the spatial patterns of economic activities. a. Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations between the end of the Civil War and 1900 and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas (e.g., Pittsburgh’s rapid growth in the late nineteenth century). b. Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations since the turn of the 20th century and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas (e.g., Chicago’s rapid growth at the turn of the century).

Weeks 6-9: Science Lessons (see Science tabs)