September 23

Honors World Literature October 3-7

Honors World Literature                            October 3-7  

Planning Your Week:

Early turn in for The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis Part II and The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal–submit by 4:00 a.m. (Friday night/Saturday morning Sept. 23-4) for extra credit. Otherwise you must submit by 10:00 a.m. Monday, October 3.

No Membean practice required! (Earn extra credit if you choose to do practice this week; you can earn 10 pts each for completing 45 minutes of practice by Sun., Sept. 25 and 45 minutes of practice by Sun., Oct. 2.).

Mon. 10/3—The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal entries (15 entries from 10 chapters) and Literary Analysis Part II. If you did not participate in early turn-in, these must be submitted to Turnitin.com by the start of class Monday morning.

Wed. 10/5–The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ article due at the end of class.

PSAT is October 19. Click here for PSAT guide.

 

September 23

AP Literature October 3-7

WEEK 9

No Membean practice required! (Earn extra credit if you choose to do practice this week; you can earn 10 pts each for completing 45 minutes of practice by Sun., Sept. 25 and 45 minutes of practice by Sun., Oct. 2.)

Due Wed., Oct. 5 at 11:59 p.m. you must complete the PeerMark assignment in Turnitin.com. 

Monday, October 3

1.    Warm-up: MCM #5 (poetry)

2.   Review Act I and Act II Scenes 1-2

3.    Introduce blocking & stage directions; the way a director decides to block a scene conveys meaning that can either reinforce or contradict the spoken word; use four – ten volunteers (Cassio, Othello, Desdemona, Iago, & attendees) to be silent actors while four other actors read the scene to line 37. The remaining class will direct. Decide how the characters enter, how many attendants enter, where they stand, whether all or only some exit with Othello, where they stand in relation to each other, and so on.

4.    Perform subtext scenarios, focusing on intonation of words and nonverbal cues that express meaning to an audience.

5.    Assign three acting companies for the “Drinking Scene.” Collaborate to analyze Othello 2.3; design a performance with blocking, stage directions, and subtext, justifying the directorial choices.

*Homework:  Read research novels—group meeting Friday; complete PeerMark by Wednesday evening, 11:59 p.m.

 

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Tuesday, October 4

1.   Warm-up: Creative Writing Tuesday (slide 20)

2.    Analyze & rehearse “The Drinking Scene”

*Homework:  Read research novels—group meeting Friday; complete PeerMark by Wednesday evening, 11:59 p.m.

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Wednesday, October 5

    1. Warm-up: FRQ Wednesday (prose); review “Birthday Party” w/Captain Obvious; examine scored samples.

2. Analyze & rehearse “The Drinking Scene.”

*Homework:  Read research novelsgroup meeting Friday; complete PeerMark by tonight at 11:59 p.m.

 

Learning goal(s): Create an engaging, interactive presentation to present your findings to the class and apply a range of themes found in Othello.

 

Thursday, October 6

1. Warm-up: Pondering Poetry

2. Rehearse and perform “The Drinking Scene”

3. Ticket-out-the-door: Evaluate each group’s performance; identify strengths and highlight key points in the scene.

*Homework:  Read research novels—group meeting Friday.

 

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Friday, October 7

1. Warm-up: Fun Friday–practice convergent thinking.

2. Collaborate with research groups to clarify reading and plan museums.

3. Perform the “Temptation Scene” Lesson 16

*Homework: Read research novels.

 

Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text.

September 16

Honors World Literature September 19-23

Honors World Literature                            September 19-23      

 

Planning Your Week:

Sun. 9/18—Membean practice due (make sure your accuracy is 85% or greater to earn full credit).

Mon. 9/19—Read through chapter 8 of The Joy Luck Club. 

Fri. 9/23—The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis II (character development and theme paragraphs); early turn-in for The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal entries (15 entries from 10 chapters)

Read online at The Joy Luck Club pdf.

*Vocab. Study Plan: Complete Membean practice in 15 minute increments or less. 

 

Monday, September 19

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. IAN: List ways in which parents and children embarrass one another. How do cultural and generational differences affect parent/child relationships? Use at least three Membean words and three verbals.
  2. Review chapters 1-8 of The Joy Luck Club, focusing on setting, mood, and diction.
  3. Introduce family portrait assignment and construct family trees
    1. Students will work to analyze several aspects of character development, motivation and connection to themes in the novel
    2. JLC family portrait assignment
  4. Read/analyze chapter 9-10: “Rice Husband” and “Four Directions”; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on character development and theme paragraphs.

 

Tuesday, September 20

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. IAN: Ponder and Respond: Is Rose in any way responsible for Bing’s death?
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 11-12: “Without Wood” and “Best Quality”; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on character development and theme paragraphs.

 

Wednesday, September 21

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. IAN: Ponder and Respond—At the start of “Without Wood,” Rose tells of her believing in her mother’s tales of ghosts and magic because “the power of her words was that strong.” At the end of the story, when she tells Ted he can’t throw her away, he looks confused and scared: “The power of my words was that strong.” What does this repetition show about mother and daughter and East and West?
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 13-14: “Magpies” and “Waiting Between the Trees”; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on character development and theme paragraphs.

 

Thursday, September 22

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. IAN: The Garden of Marriage—Tan uses garden and weed imagery to show the condition of Ted and Rose’s marriage in “Without Wood.” Even Mr. Chou is incorporated into the image pattern. Trace the images through Rose’s story and decide what each images represents and how it fits into the pattern. Consider what the former condition of the garden shows about Ted; what the present condition reveals about Rose; what the imagery suggests about the future of their marriage. Explain how hulihuda connects to the imagery. What is the significance of Rose’s final dream? Her name?
  2. Computer Lab: compose journal entries.
  3. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 15-16: “Double Face” and “A Pair of Tickets”; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on character development and theme paragraphs.

 

Friday, September 23

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone. 

  1. IAN: An-mei’s mother tells her about the turtle that eats tears and knkows a person’s misery. The tears produce magpies, birds of joy. She says, “Your tears do not wash away your sorrows. They feed someone else’s joy. And that is why you must learn to swallow your own tears.” Pick from one of the following women in the novel to explain how they “swallow their tears”: Suyuan, Taitai, An-mei, Lindo, Ying-ying, Lena, Rose, or Waverly.
  2. View The Joy Luck Club, comparing/contrasting the film director’s techniques with the author’s techniques for building setting, mood, tone, character, and theme.

*Homework: Finish Scholar’s Journal entries if you did not participate in early turn-in.

 

SEPTEMBER BREAK!

 

Honors World Literature                            October 3-7  

 

Planning Your Week:

 

No Membean practice required! (Earn extra credit if you choose to do practice this week.)

 

Mon. 10/3—The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal entries (15 entries from 10 chapters) if you did not participate in early turn-in.

September 16

AP Literature Sept. 19-23

WEEK 8

Monday, September 19

1. Warm-up: MCM #4 (prose)

2. Read Act I Scene 3:

a.    Divide into two groups; facing each other, read antiphonally Othello’s speech beginning “Her father loved me . . . “ (1.3.149-96) to end-stops (period, colon, or semicolon)

b.    Read again, with a three-person group miming as the class reads.

c.    “Ring the Changes”—several volunteers should individually read Brabantio’s parting shot (1.3.333-34) focusing on different interpretations.

3. Close read (handout) 1.3.343-447, analyzing Iago’s persuasive & rhetorical techniques, comparing/contrasting AP Language strategies with AP Literature strategies. 

4. View the film adaptation and analyze the director’s choices.

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

           Learning Goal(s): Identify a range of interpretations of a play script.

 

Tuesday, September 20

1. Warm-up: Creative Writing (slide 5)

2. Review “Hawk Roosting” and “Golden Retrievals” with poetry strategies.

3. Introduce character objectives—Act II, Scene 1; assign parts & read through 2.1.204; discuss character objectives (what he/she wants for that scene; a goal—after each attempt to achieve it, a “beat change” occurs where he/she shifts gears to try to achieve it a different way (one also occurs when the goal is achieved, and the character creates a new goal); the “superobjective” is what he/she means to have by the end of the play.

4. Choose five students to read 2.1.161-204 on their feet (one is Emilia, who has no lines, but is in the scene); direct

5. Paraphrase Iago’s first aside 2.1.161-170; “Ring the Changes” for Iago’s second aside 2.1.190-92

6. Continue reading 2.1; for the conversation between Roderigo & Iago, cast one person as Roderigo & three as Iago (read “Round-Robin”/each person reads one sentence). Explain how Iago’s mind moves at three times the speed of Roderigo’s.

a. Cast two people to take turns reading alternating sentences for Iago’s soliloquy.

b. Discuss the opening scene of Act II:

1. Roderigo is first astonished when Iago tells him that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. How does Iago convince him?

2. What does Iago mean when he says of Desdemona “Now, I do love her too”? Do you believe Iago when he says, “I fear Cassio with my nightcap too”?

3. Do you notice particular lines that add to or change the impression give so far of any character’s personality?

4. Compare Iago’s soliloquy from Act I with this one. Has his motive changed in any way?

5. Coleridge referred to Iago’s “motiveless malignity.” Do you agree that his malignity is fundamentally without motive?

7. Closer: Read Act II Scene 2 (the Herald’s short scene); Why does Shakespeare include this scene? What effect does it have on the audience?

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

 Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Wednesday, September 20

1. Computer Lab: Revise FRQ#4 Poetry; complete peer review through Turnitin.com

*Homework: Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

          Learning goal(s): Demonstrate mastery of standards on timed writing assessment.

 

Thursday, September 21

1.    Warm-up: Pondering Poetry

2.    Present Ira Aldridge, Paul Robeson, and Other Othello Productions

3.    Finish discussion of 2.1-2; compare/contrast with film adaptation.

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Friday, September 22

1.    Warm-up: “Fun” Friday; collaborate with research novel groups to continue analyzing the novel and planning the museum.

2.   Review Act I and Act II Scenes 1-2

3.    Introduce blocking & stage directions; the way a director decides to block a scene conveys meaning that can either reinforce or contradict the spoken word; use four – ten volunteers (Cassio, Othello, Desdemona, Iago, & attendees) to be silent actors while four other actors read the scene to line 37. The remaining class will direct. Decide how the characters enter, how many attendants enter, where they stand, whether all or only some exit with Othello, where they stand in relation to each other, and so on.

4.    Perform subtext scenarios, focusing on intonation of words and nonverbal cues that express meaning to an audience. 

5.    Assign three acting companies for the “Drinking Scene.” Collaborate to analyze Othello 2.3; design a performance with blocking, stage directions, and subtext, justifying the directorial choices. 

*Homework:  Read research novels; enjoy your break!

            Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text.

September 9

Honors World Literature Sept. 12-16

Honors World Literature                            September 12-16      

 

Planning Your Week:

 

Sun. 9/11—Membean practice due (make sure your accuracy is 85% or greater to earn full credit).

Mon. 9/12—Read through chapter 4 of The Joy Luck Club. Bring three beans (3 Membean words; make the word large and bold with a definition and part of speech)

Fri. 9/14—Poetry Out Loud performances; The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis I (setting/mood and diction/style paragraphs)

Fri. 9/23—The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis II (character development and theme paragraphs); early turn-in for The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal entries (15 entries from 10 chapters)

Read online at The Joy Luck Club pdf.

*Vocab. Study Plan: Complete Membean practice in 15 minute increments or less. 

 

Monday, September 12

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone and develop setting. 

  1. Review beans (color code and sort into parts of speech on the wall). Write 5 summary sentences using 5 different Membean words and a verbal in each (use all three verbal types) about The Joy Luck Club.
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 1-4: Feathers from a Thousand Li Away; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on setting/mood and diction/style paragraphs; work on Poetry Out Loud TPFASST and performances.

 

Tuesday, September 13

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone and develop setting. 

  1. Computer Lab: compose setting/mood and diction paragraphs.
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 5: “Rules of the Game”; complete dialectical journal entries.
  3. Discuss responses to chapter 1 questions.
  4. IAN: ponder and respond—Both An-mei and Taitai suffer wounds that result in scars while in tentative contact with their mothers in “Scar.” Examine the cause of the wounds, the connections to the mothers, and An-mei’s comment about her scars. What do these scars figuratively mean?

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on setting/mood and diction/style paragraphs; work on Poetry Out Loud TPFASST and performances.

 

Wednesday, September 14

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone and develop setting. 

  1. IAN: Ponder and Respond: Is Rose in any way responsible for Bing’s death
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 6: “The Voice from the Wall”; complete dialectical journal entries.
  3. Introduce family portrait assignment and construct family trees
    1. Students will work to analyze several aspects of character development, motivation and connection to themes in the novel
    2. JLC family portrait assignment

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on setting/mood and diction/style paragraphs; work on Poetry Out Loud TPFASST and performances.

 

Thursday, September 15

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone and develop setting. 

  1. Computer Lab: compose journal entries.
  2. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 7: “Half and Half”; complete dialectical journal entries.
  3. Continue working on character portraits and family tree construction
  4. Rehearse for Poetry Out Loud with your Chinese family as an audience.
    1. Provide feedback on physical presence; gestures; pronunciation; delivery volume and emotion

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on setting/mood and diction/style paragraphs; work on Poetry Out Loud TPFASST and performances.

 

Friday, September 16

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone and develop setting. 

  1. Perform Poetry Out Loud
  2. IAN: List ways in which parents and children embarrass one another. How do cultural and generational differences affect parent/child relationships? Use at least five Membean words and various verbals. How Can I Embarrass You? Let Me Count the Ways.
  3. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 8: “Two Kinds”; complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Continue reading The Joy Luck Club; work on theme & character development paragraphs.

September 9

AP Literature September 12-16

WEEK 7

Monday, September 12

1. Warm-up: MCM #3 (poetry)

2. View the prologue from the BBC and Fishburne versions of the movie; compare & contrast the directors’ choices. 

3. Prepare & rehearse scenes for 1.2; perform if time permits. 

4. Closer—Discuss performances:

a.    We saw Othello for the first time in this scene—is he what you thought he would be? Is he respected by his associates? How do you know?

b.    What contrasts are there between the way Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio have described Othello and the way he looks and behaves when he actually appears?

c.    Do you notice basic differences in attitude between Cassio and Iago in their short conversation (1.2.60-65) following Othello’s exit?

d.    Why is Brabantio convinced that Othello must have used witchcraft on his daughter? Why does he have difficulty believing his daughter could run to Othello’s “sooty bosom’?

*Homework:  Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning Goal(s): Identify a range of interpretations of a play script.

 

Tuesday, September 13

1. Warm-up: Creative Writing (slide 5 & write in the voice of animal)

2. Present Moors & Turks

3. Read Act I Scene 3:

a.    Divide into two groups; facing each other, read antiphonally Othello’s speech beginning “Her father loved me . . . “ (1.3.149-96) to end-stops (period, colon, or semicolon)

b.    Read again, with a three-person group miming as the class reads.

c.    “Ring the Changes”—several volunteers should individually read Brabantio’s parting shot (1.3.333-34) focusing on different interpretations.

4. Close read (handout) 1.3.343-447, analyzing Iago’s persuasive & rhetorical techniques, comparing/contrasting AP Language strategies with AP Literature strategies. 

*Homework:  Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Wednesday, September 14

1. Warm-up: FRQ #4 (poetry)

2.    Introduce character objectives—Act II, Scene 1; assign parts & read through 2.1.204; discuss character objectives (what he/she wants for that scene; a goal—after each attempt to achieve it, a “beat change” occurs where he/she shifts gears to try to achieve it a different way (one also occurs when the goal is achieved, and the character creates a new goal); the “superobjective” is what he/she means to have by the end of the play.

3.    Choose five students to read 2.1.161-204 on their feet (one is Emilia, who has no lines, but is in the scene); direct

4.    Paraphrase Iago’s first aside 2.1.161-170; “Ring the Changes” for Iago’s second aside 2.1.190-92

5.   Continue reading 2.1; for the conversation between Roderigo & Iago, cast one person as Roderigo & three as Iago (read “Round-Robin”/each person reads one sentence). Explain how Iago’s mind moves at three times the speed of Roderigo’s.

6.    Cast two people to take turns reading alternating sentences for Iago’s soliloquy.

7.    Discuss the opening scene of Act II:

a. Roderigo is first astonished when Iago tells him that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. How does Iago convince him?

b. What does Iago mean when he says of Desdemona “Now, I do love her too”? Do you believe Iago when he says, “I fear Cassio with my nightcap too”?

c. Do you notice particular lines that add to or change the impression give so far of any character’s personality?

d. Compare Iago’s soliloquy from Act I with this one. Has his motive changed in any way?

e. Coleridge referred to Iago’s “motiveless malignity.” Do you agree that his malignity is fundamentally without motive?

8.    Closer: Read Act II Scene 2 (the Herald’s short scene); Why does Shakespeare include this scene? What effect does it have on the audience?

*Homework: Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Demonstrate mastery of standards on timed writing assessment.

 

Thursday, September 15

1.    Warm-up: Theme Thursday (discuss Schoology posts)

2.    Present Ira Aldridge, Paul Robeson, and Other Othello Productions

3.    Finish discussion of 2.1-2

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Friday, September 16

1.    Warm-up: “Fun” Friday; collaborate with research novel groups to select roles, exchange contact into, and plan a reading schedule.

2.    Introduce character objectives—Act II, Scene 1; assign parts & read through 2.1.204; discuss character objectives (what he/she wants for that scene; a goal—after each attempt to achieve it, a “beat change” occurs where he/she shifts gears to try to achieve it a different way (one also occurs when the goal is achieved, and the character creates a new goal); the “superobjective” is what he/she means to have by the end of the play.

3.     Choose five students to read 2.1.161-204 on their feet (one is Emilia, who has no lines, but is in the scene); direct

4.     Paraphrase Iago’s first aside 2.1.161-170; “Ring the Changes” for Iago’s second aside 2.1.190-92

5.    Continue reading 2.1; for the conversation between Roderigo & Iago, cast one person as Roderigo & three as Iago (read “Round-Robin”/each person reads one sentence). Explain how Iago’s mind moves at three times the speed of Roderigo’s.

6.    Cast two people to take turns reading alternating sentences for Iago’s soliloquy.

7.    Discuss the opening scene of Act II:

a. Roderigo is first astonished when Iago tells him that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. How does Iago convince him?

b. What does Iago mean when he says of Desdemona “Now, I do love her too”? Do you believe Iago when he says, “I fear Cassio with my nightcap too”?

c. Do you notice particular lines that add to or change the impression give so far of any character’s personality?

d. Compare Iago’s soliloquy from Act I with this one. Has his motive changed in any way?

e. Coleridge referred to Iago’s “motiveless malignity.” Do you agree that his malignity is fundamentally without motive?

8.    Closer: Read Act II Scene 2 (the Herald’s short scene); Why does Shakespeare include this scene? What effect does it have on the audience?

*Homework:  Read research novels; finish Membean practice.

 

Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text.

September 3

Honors World Literature Sept. 6-9

Planning Your Week:

Continue revising your essay due Friday. Keep all drafts and editing notes, and submit to Turnitin.com.

Sun. 9/4—Membean practice due (make sure your accuracy is 85% or greater to earn full credit).

Wed. 9/7—Bring your 2 poems from the Poetry Out Loud site. Membean vocabulary assessment (must be completed Wednesday afternoon).

Fri. 9/9–Bring a hard copy of your revised, typed essay to class along with your rough draft and editing notes. You should also submit your file to Turnitin.com before class.

**Our next unit is on The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan. Please obtain a copy (Amazon or Barnes and Noble are similarly priced at $9.52). Contact me if you have any issues with obtaining the book.** Or read online at The Joy Luck Club pdf.

 

*Vocab. Study Plan: Complete Membean practice in 15 minute increments or less.

 

Monday, September 5—Labor Day Holiday

 

Tuesday, September 6

LG: Formulate and share opinions about the immigrant experience and the idea of game play.

  1. IAN: Expand the analogy of the experience of the Uno game to the immigrant experience. Explain the social and cultural importance of games. Use at least three Membean words in your response; highlight each word.
  2. Anticipation Guide: Assess the statements and formulate your opinion; assert yourself and persuade others to see your point of view.
  3. Review reading schedule and dialectical journal assignment for reading.
  4. Read The Joy Luck Club opening prologue and chapter 1: “The Joy Luck Club”; examine the structure of the novel and complete dialectical journal entries.

*Homework: Bring your Poetry Out Loud poems to class tomorrow.

 

Wednesday, September 7

LG: Apply skills for close reading, gathering evidence, and making inferences to poems.  

  1. IAN: Return to your TPFASST for “Ode on a Grecian Urn”; complete analysis of the poem.
  2. Analyze Chinese poetry for cultural and thematic concepts.
  3. Apply TPFASTT method for analyzing to your Poetry Out Loud poems (mark hard stop punctuation; identify nouns, verbs, modifiers; differentiate between concrete & abstract ideas; look up unfamiliar words; begin analyzing theme).

*Homework: Complete Membean vocabulary assessment.

 

Thursday, September 8

LG: Develop understanding of another culture’s beliefs and values.

  1. PSAT skills review: read the article “World War II and San Francisco” and answer the questions; review strategies for Reading: Information and Ideas.
  2. Analyze illustrations from Chinese Fables using the Feldman Method of Art Criticism.
  3. Read Chinese myths from Chinese Fables and
  • What do you learn about Chinese customs?
  • What is the position of or attitude towards women?
  • What beliefs or morals are put forth?
  • What mystical or enigmatic elements does each have?
  1. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 2-3: “Scar” and “The Red Candle”; complete dialectical journal entries. Consider how emigrating to the United States from China affected people’s values.

*Homework: Finish your essay revisions and submit to Turnitin.com; bring a printed copy to turn in to me tomorrow.

 

Friday, September 9

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone. 

  1. IAN: List ways in which parents and children embarrass one another. How do cultural and generational differences affect parent/child relationships?
  2. PSAT skills review: read the short story/prose poem “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid and answer the questions; review strategies for answering Reading: Rhetoric.
  3. Discuss the parent/child relationship in Kincaid’s “Girl,” making connections to other cultures: compare/contrast which elements seem to be universal vs. those that seem to be cultural.
  4. Read/analyze The Joy Luck Club chapter 4: “The Moon Lady”; complete dialectical journal entries.

 

September 3

AP Literature September 6-9

Planning Your Week:

Sun. 9/4—Membean practice due (make sure your accuracy is 85% or greater to earn full credit).

Fri. 9/9–Bring a copy of your research novel to class; directors prepare an agenda and team building exercise, and reading coaches prepare questions for your group meeting.

 

WEEK 6

Monday, September 5—Labor Day Holiday

 

Tuesday, September 6

1.      Warm-up: Creative Writing Tuesday—Slide 10

       2.      Finish round-robin reading of 1.1.74-160 (Lesson 2 “Zounds, Sir, You’re Robbed”)—

a. students sit in a circle and read a complete thought, stopping at the period, question mark, exclamation mark, or semicolon

b. read part-by-part instead of sentence-by-sentence; jot down notes circling unfamiliar words and writing questions

c. discuss the action:

i. who are Roderigo & Iago? What kind of people are they? What does each seem to want from the other? Who’s in control? What has just happened? Who is Brabantio? What sort of person do you think the Moor is? What about Brabantio’s daughter—how do you picture her? Why is it that neither Othello nor Desdemona is mentioned by name in this scene?

ii. What sort of language does Iago use to tell Brabantio of his daughter’s elopement? On what sort of fears and prejudices is Iago playing?

d. Divide the scene into three sections; cast a different set of actors for each section & have students read in succession. Discuss the differences between the readings & instruct them to try to imagine the voices as they continue reading. 

e. Act the scene—cast characters; the rest of the class will serve as directors to suggest movement, inflection, & interpretation. 

4. Finish reading 1.1; discuss the following questions:

a. Why do Iago, Roderigo, & Brabantio hate the man they are discussing?

b. What reasons does Iago give for continuing to follow his master?

c. What kind of person do you expect the man they discuss to be? How do you imagine him? Count the number of times the word Moor is used in 1.1. Can you draw any conclusions?

 

Learning goal(s): Understand a range of themes that will be addressed in Othello.

 

Wednesday, September 7

1. Warm-up: FRQ # 3 Prose

2, Review Othello 1.1; discuss the following questions:

     a.    Why do Iago, Roderigo, & Brabantio hate the man they are discussing? 

     b.   What reasons does Iago give for continuing to follow his master?

     c.   What kind of person do you expect the man they discuss to be? How do you imagine him? Count the number of times the word Moor is used in 1.1. Can you draw any conclusions?

 Learning goal(s): Demonstrate mastery of standards on timed writing assessment.

 

Thursday, September 8

1. Warm-up: Pondering Poetry #2 (Drama)

2. Prepare & rehearse scenes for 1.2; perform if time permits.

3. Closer—Discuss performances:

a.    We saw Othello for the first time in this scene—is he what you thought he would be? Is he respected by his associates? How do you know?

b.    What contrasts are there between the way Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio have described Othello and the way he looks and behaves when he actually appears?

c.    Do you notice basic differences in attitude between Cassio and Iago in their short conversation (1.2.60-65) following Othello’s exit?

d.    Why is Brabantio convinced that Othello must have used witchcraft on his daughter? Why does he have difficulty believing his daughter could run to Othello’s “sooty bosom’?

Learning Goal(s): Create an engaging, interactive presentation to present your findings to the class and apply a range of themes found in Othello.

 

Friday, September 9

1. Warm-up: Fun Friday! Practice convergent thinking.

2. Meet with research novel groups to select roles, exchange contact into, and plan a reading schedule.

3. Present Venice/Cyprus and Moors/Turks dramaturgy.

4. View the prologue from the BBC and Fishburne versions of the movie; compare & contrast the directors’ choices. 

5. Create hats for the major characters. (Lesson 3 “I Am Not What I Am”)

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning Goal(s): Identify a range of interpretations of a play script.