September 3

AP Literature September 6-9

Planning Your Week:

Sun. 9/4—Membean practice due (make sure your accuracy is 85% or greater to earn full credit).

Fri. 9/9–Bring a copy of your research novel to class; directors prepare an agenda and team building exercise, and reading coaches prepare questions for your group meeting.

 

WEEK 6

Monday, September 5—Labor Day Holiday

 

Tuesday, September 6

1.      Warm-up: Creative Writing Tuesday—Slide 10

       2.      Finish round-robin reading of 1.1.74-160 (Lesson 2 “Zounds, Sir, You’re Robbed”)—

a. students sit in a circle and read a complete thought, stopping at the period, question mark, exclamation mark, or semicolon

b. read part-by-part instead of sentence-by-sentence; jot down notes circling unfamiliar words and writing questions

c. discuss the action:

i. who are Roderigo & Iago? What kind of people are they? What does each seem to want from the other? Who’s in control? What has just happened? Who is Brabantio? What sort of person do you think the Moor is? What about Brabantio’s daughter—how do you picture her? Why is it that neither Othello nor Desdemona is mentioned by name in this scene?

ii. What sort of language does Iago use to tell Brabantio of his daughter’s elopement? On what sort of fears and prejudices is Iago playing?

d. Divide the scene into three sections; cast a different set of actors for each section & have students read in succession. Discuss the differences between the readings & instruct them to try to imagine the voices as they continue reading. 

e. Act the scene—cast characters; the rest of the class will serve as directors to suggest movement, inflection, & interpretation. 

4. Finish reading 1.1; discuss the following questions:

a. Why do Iago, Roderigo, & Brabantio hate the man they are discussing?

b. What reasons does Iago give for continuing to follow his master?

c. What kind of person do you expect the man they discuss to be? How do you imagine him? Count the number of times the word Moor is used in 1.1. Can you draw any conclusions?

 

Learning goal(s): Understand a range of themes that will be addressed in Othello.

 

Wednesday, September 7

1. Warm-up: FRQ # 3 Prose

2, Review Othello 1.1; discuss the following questions:

     a.    Why do Iago, Roderigo, & Brabantio hate the man they are discussing? 

     b.   What reasons does Iago give for continuing to follow his master?

     c.   What kind of person do you expect the man they discuss to be? How do you imagine him? Count the number of times the word Moor is used in 1.1. Can you draw any conclusions?

 Learning goal(s): Demonstrate mastery of standards on timed writing assessment.

 

Thursday, September 8

1. Warm-up: Pondering Poetry #2 (Drama)

2. Prepare & rehearse scenes for 1.2; perform if time permits.

3. Closer—Discuss performances:

a.    We saw Othello for the first time in this scene—is he what you thought he would be? Is he respected by his associates? How do you know?

b.    What contrasts are there between the way Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio have described Othello and the way he looks and behaves when he actually appears?

c.    Do you notice basic differences in attitude between Cassio and Iago in their short conversation (1.2.60-65) following Othello’s exit?

d.    Why is Brabantio convinced that Othello must have used witchcraft on his daughter? Why does he have difficulty believing his daughter could run to Othello’s “sooty bosom’?

Learning Goal(s): Create an engaging, interactive presentation to present your findings to the class and apply a range of themes found in Othello.

 

Friday, September 9

1. Warm-up: Fun Friday! Practice convergent thinking.

2. Meet with research novel groups to select roles, exchange contact into, and plan a reading schedule.

3. Present Venice/Cyprus and Moors/Turks dramaturgy.

4. View the prologue from the BBC and Fishburne versions of the movie; compare & contrast the directors’ choices. 

5. Create hats for the major characters. (Lesson 3 “I Am Not What I Am”)

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning Goal(s): Identify a range of interpretations of a play script.


Posted September 3, 2016 by Rachael Sanford in category AP Literature

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