September 9

AP Literature September 12-16

WEEK 7

Monday, September 12

1. Warm-up: MCM #3 (poetry)

2. View the prologue from the BBC and Fishburne versions of the movie; compare & contrast the directors’ choices. 

3. Prepare & rehearse scenes for 1.2; perform if time permits. 

4. Closer—Discuss performances:

a.    We saw Othello for the first time in this scene—is he what you thought he would be? Is he respected by his associates? How do you know?

b.    What contrasts are there between the way Iago, Roderigo, and Brabantio have described Othello and the way he looks and behaves when he actually appears?

c.    Do you notice basic differences in attitude between Cassio and Iago in their short conversation (1.2.60-65) following Othello’s exit?

d.    Why is Brabantio convinced that Othello must have used witchcraft on his daughter? Why does he have difficulty believing his daughter could run to Othello’s “sooty bosom’?

*Homework:  Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning Goal(s): Identify a range of interpretations of a play script.

 

Tuesday, September 13

1. Warm-up: Creative Writing (slide 5 & write in the voice of animal)

2. Present Moors & Turks

3. Read Act I Scene 3:

a.    Divide into two groups; facing each other, read antiphonally Othello’s speech beginning “Her father loved me . . . “ (1.3.149-96) to end-stops (period, colon, or semicolon)

b.    Read again, with a three-person group miming as the class reads.

c.    “Ring the Changes”—several volunteers should individually read Brabantio’s parting shot (1.3.333-34) focusing on different interpretations.

4. Close read (handout) 1.3.343-447, analyzing Iago’s persuasive & rhetorical techniques, comparing/contrasting AP Language strategies with AP Literature strategies. 

*Homework:  Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Wednesday, September 14

1. Warm-up: FRQ #4 (poetry)

2.    Introduce character objectives—Act II, Scene 1; assign parts & read through 2.1.204; discuss character objectives (what he/she wants for that scene; a goal—after each attempt to achieve it, a “beat change” occurs where he/she shifts gears to try to achieve it a different way (one also occurs when the goal is achieved, and the character creates a new goal); the “superobjective” is what he/she means to have by the end of the play.

3.    Choose five students to read 2.1.161-204 on their feet (one is Emilia, who has no lines, but is in the scene); direct

4.    Paraphrase Iago’s first aside 2.1.161-170; “Ring the Changes” for Iago’s second aside 2.1.190-92

5.   Continue reading 2.1; for the conversation between Roderigo & Iago, cast one person as Roderigo & three as Iago (read “Round-Robin”/each person reads one sentence). Explain how Iago’s mind moves at three times the speed of Roderigo’s.

6.    Cast two people to take turns reading alternating sentences for Iago’s soliloquy.

7.    Discuss the opening scene of Act II:

a. Roderigo is first astonished when Iago tells him that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. How does Iago convince him?

b. What does Iago mean when he says of Desdemona “Now, I do love her too”? Do you believe Iago when he says, “I fear Cassio with my nightcap too”?

c. Do you notice particular lines that add to or change the impression give so far of any character’s personality?

d. Compare Iago’s soliloquy from Act I with this one. Has his motive changed in any way?

e. Coleridge referred to Iago’s “motiveless malignity.” Do you agree that his malignity is fundamentally without motive?

8.    Closer: Read Act II Scene 2 (the Herald’s short scene); Why does Shakespeare include this scene? What effect does it have on the audience?

*Homework: Read research novels; Schoology post Wed. 11:59 p.m.; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Demonstrate mastery of standards on timed writing assessment.

 

Thursday, September 15

1.    Warm-up: Theme Thursday (discuss Schoology posts)

2.    Present Ira Aldridge, Paul Robeson, and Other Othello Productions

3.    Finish discussion of 2.1-2

*Homework:  Read research novels; prepare for group meetings.

 

Learning goal(s): Use nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Friday, September 16

1.    Warm-up: “Fun” Friday; collaborate with research novel groups to select roles, exchange contact into, and plan a reading schedule.

2.    Introduce character objectives—Act II, Scene 1; assign parts & read through 2.1.204; discuss character objectives (what he/she wants for that scene; a goal—after each attempt to achieve it, a “beat change” occurs where he/she shifts gears to try to achieve it a different way (one also occurs when the goal is achieved, and the character creates a new goal); the “superobjective” is what he/she means to have by the end of the play.

3.     Choose five students to read 2.1.161-204 on their feet (one is Emilia, who has no lines, but is in the scene); direct

4.     Paraphrase Iago’s first aside 2.1.161-170; “Ring the Changes” for Iago’s second aside 2.1.190-92

5.    Continue reading 2.1; for the conversation between Roderigo & Iago, cast one person as Roderigo & three as Iago (read “Round-Robin”/each person reads one sentence). Explain how Iago’s mind moves at three times the speed of Roderigo’s.

6.    Cast two people to take turns reading alternating sentences for Iago’s soliloquy.

7.    Discuss the opening scene of Act II:

a. Roderigo is first astonished when Iago tells him that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. How does Iago convince him?

b. What does Iago mean when he says of Desdemona “Now, I do love her too”? Do you believe Iago when he says, “I fear Cassio with my nightcap too”?

c. Do you notice particular lines that add to or change the impression give so far of any character’s personality?

d. Compare Iago’s soliloquy from Act I with this one. Has his motive changed in any way?

e. Coleridge referred to Iago’s “motiveless malignity.” Do you agree that his malignity is fundamentally without motive?

8.    Closer: Read Act II Scene 2 (the Herald’s short scene); Why does Shakespeare include this scene? What effect does it have on the audience?

*Homework:  Read research novels; finish Membean practice.

 

Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text.


Posted September 9, 2016 by Rachael Sanford in category AP Literature

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