October 29

Honors World Literature October 31-November 4

Honors World Literature                                            

 

Planning Your Week: October 31—November 4

Sun. 10/31—Membean practice due.

Thurs. 11/17–LAST DAY to turn in Julius Caesar choice board assessments. No work will be accepted after Thanksgiving break.

 

Monday, October 31

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener— Review Act I Scene 2 Lines 25-189, p. 24-30, and from Cassius’s rhetoric identify one example each of ethos, logos, and pathos. Include a lead-in, citation, and commentary/interpretation for each quote you select.
  2. Review differences in narrative techniques between poetry and prose; summarize Hamlet’s “To be or not to be” soliloquy and view three clips to critique various interpretations of a scene
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ei0fnP9s0KA Mel Gibson
    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjuZq-8PUw0 Kenneth Branagh
    3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muLAzfQDS3M Adrian Lester
    4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ks-NbCHUns Sir Laurence Olivier
  3. Compare film portrayals and discuss blocking techniques for staging a scene—(how to annotate a text for nuance of speech and gestures); model with 1.2.1-82.
  4. Student-Led Work Session— analyze a section of Act II, applying understanding of character, plot, and subtext to perform the scene, adding blocking, physical movement, gestures, props, and sound effects.
  5. Closer—How does the physical and vocal delivery of a monologue affect the audience’s perception of a character? Cite examples from one of the clips viewed today.

*Homework: Continue to work on JC Choice Board.

 

Tuesday, November 1

LG: Understand plot, character development, and dramatic irony in Julius Caesar 

  1. Opener— Rehearse with your group to review your plan to perform student adaptations of Julius Caesar
  1. Work session—student groups perform adapted scenes
  2. Closer—Consider JC Choice Board level 2 option for a monologue. Revisit JC Word Trace (handout). Review the section of Act II that you performed; select this single most important sentence that connects to a thematic topic (see the Word Trace handout for ideas). Paraphrase the line and explain how it connects to one of the thematic topics.

*Homework: Continue to work on JC Choice Board.

 

Wednesday, November 2

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—Paraphrase 2.2.41-51, focusing on connections between the speakers.
  2. Student-led work session: Students will compete to organize the events of a scene from Act III of Julius Caesar.
    1. Roman Empire groups will receive a text summary of a scene from Act III of Julius Caesar.
    2. They will also receive a Ziploc baggy of lines cut into strips from their assigned scene.
    3. Using the summary of the act, they must paraphrase the lines in order to chronologically sequence the actors’ lines into a cohesive order that fits the action of the summary.
    4. They will assemble their lines in order on a butcher paper poster.
  3. Read/analyze Act III, focusing on Antony’s and Brutus’s actions in the immediate aftermath of Caesar’s death. Complete STEAL graphic organizer for each character.
  4. Closer—Mystery envelopes

*Homework: Continue to work on JC Choice Board.

 

Thursday, November 3

LG: Analyze a film director’s interpretation of Julius Caesar focusing on character and theme.

  1. Opener—Review vocabulary from Act I, II, and III.
  2. View Julius Caesar, analyzing the film director’s choices (camera angles, choice of actors, set, costumes, sound effects, music, etc.) and evaluating the effectiveness of this interpretation.

*Homework: Continue to work on JC Choice Board.

 

Friday, Nov. 4

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener: watch a scene from Law and Order https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjG2AMYiyrg where the lawyers deliver closing arguments from a murder. Critique the persuasive and rhetorical moves each lawyer makes.
  2. Review Act III of Julius Caesar, considering the question of whether the conspirators are justified in killing Caesar.
  3. Analyze evidence supporting and refuting the conspirators’ actions. For example, consider the following:
    • Caesar’s physical limitations (I ii 95-131)
    • Why should Caesar be king? (I.ii. 135-141)
    • The fate of Marullus and Flavius (I.ii. 281-287)
    • Brutus’s reasons for killing Caesar (I.i. 10-34)
    • Caesar refuses the crown (I. ii. 220-246)
    • Caesar’s will (III.ii. 240-244 and 249-254)
  4. Teams will compile text evidence in the style of persuasive “closing argument remarks” and vote if Caesar should be assassinated based on the evidence up to Caesar’s speech 3.1.58-73.
  5. Closer—Defend your vote in a short response and summarize Caesar’s good and bad qualities according to the text thus far.
October 29

AP Literature Oct. 31-Nov. 4

Week 13

 Upcoming Due Dates:

Wednesday, 11/2–Primary & secondary quotes due

Monday, 11/7–Perform absurd plays

Wednesday, 11/9–Museum projects begin

Wednesday, 11/16–Research papers due

 

Monday, October 31

  1. Warm-up: Review open prompts
  2. Compose a rough draft of literary analysis/research paper
  3. Perform The Sandbox.
  4. Identify characteristics of Theatre of the Absurd; view and analyze clips from Absurd plays; brainstorm absurd aspects of current society. 
  5. Assign absurd plays; create and rehearse absurd plays to perform Friday. 

*Homework:  Absurd plays due Monday; research six primary quotes and three secondary articles with six quotes due Wednesday.

Learning Goal(s): Understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.

 

Tuesday, November 1

  1. Continue to create and rehearse absurd plays to perform.

*Homework:  Absurd plays due Monday; research six primary quotes and three secondary articles with six quotes due Wednesday.

 

Learning Goal(s): Understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.
 

Wednesday, November 2

  1. Continue to create and rehearse absurd plays to perform.

*Homework:  Absurd plays due Monday; research six primary quotes and three secondary articles with six quotes due Wednesday.

 

Learning Goal(s): Understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.
 

Thursday, November 3

  1. Synthesize evidence from relevant secondary articles and your analysis of your research novel; compose a rough draft. 
  2. Rehearse absurd plays for tomorrow’s performances.

*Homework:  Perform absurd plays due Monday; research final paper due Wednesday.

 

Learning goal(s): Synthesize available articles for your research paper.

 

Friday, November 4

  1. Synthesize evidence from relevant secondary articles and your analysis of your research novel; compose a rough draft. 
  2. Rehearse absurd plays for tomorrow’s performances.

*Homework:  Perform absurd plays due Monday; research final paper due Wednesday.

 

Learning goal(s): Synthesize available articles for your research paper.

October 21

Honors World Literature October 24-29

Honors World Literature                           

 

Planning Your Week: October 24-28

Sun. 10/23—Membean practice due.

 

Monday, October 24

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—IAN: Add Unit 3 Table of Contents and SMELL graphic organizer for analyzing rhetoric to your IAN.
  2. Review (whole class) Marc Antony’s monologue from Act 3, Scene 2 of Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (lines 1-35 on the handout). Analyze the rhetorical impact of the speech by completing SMELL graphic organizer. (Springboard)
  3. Student-Led Work Session— Students choose between passage 2, 3, or 4 to complete SMELL analysis independently on a second monologue.
  4. Introduce Caesar choice board and guidelines for study of the play.
  5. Closer—IAN: Share examples of impactful language with the class. How do these diction choices affect tone?

 

Tuesday, October 25

LG: Debate thematic connections to Julius Caesar.   

  1. Opener—Listen to the soldier scenario; read it independently and begin to formulate opinions on the discussion questions.
  2. Collaborate with Roman Empire groups to debate the issues.
  3. View Shmoop Introduction to Caesar.
  4. Read/analyze opening scenes in Act I.
  5. Closer—choose from the Caesar choice board to begin focusing your study of the play.

*Homework:

 

Wednesday, October 26

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—Review elements of characterization; compose a character sketch based on a painting, using STEAL method.
  2. Read/analyze Julius Caesar Act I; fill in character graphic organizers (STEAL).
  3. View PBS America: The Great Commanders
  4. Closer—review Caesar choice board and add to notes.

*Homework:

Thursday, October 27

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—students will read the LA Times article on Brasil and Congress’ open letter the Secretary of State John Kerry to assess the rhetorical strategies employed
  1. Work session—students will compose a persuasive letter employing rhetorical techniques
    • Write a persuasive letter to a peer attempting to convince him to join your cause to overthrow the student council president or write a letter to the student council president warning her about a political scheme brewing to remove her from office
    • Consider the question: Are the conspirators justified in killing Caesar?
    • Divide the class into two groups. Individuals in each group will keep journals during the course of their reading.
      • Group one will look for evidence supporting the conspirators’ actions.
        • For example:
          1. Caesar’s physical limitations (I ii 95-131)
          2. Why should Caesar be king? (I.ii. 135-141)
          3. The fate of Marullus and Flavius (I.ii. 281-287)
          4. Brutus’s reasons for killing Caesar (I.i. 10-34)
  2. Group two will look for evidence refuting the conspirators’ actions.
    • For example:
      1. Caesar refuses the crown (I. ii. 220-246)
      2. Caesar’s will (III.ii. 240-244 and 249-254)
    • At the end of Caesar’s speech (III. i. 58-73), have students vote to decide if he should be assassinated. Have them defend their votes in a short response.
    • Begin reading act II of Julius Casear
  3. Closer—What are Caesar’s good/bad qualities according to the text thus far?

 

Friday, October 28

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—IAN Ponder and Respond

Consider the following lines of the play:

“Men at some time are masters of their fates:

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,

But in ourselves, that we are underlings.”

React to the statement “if people do not like what is happening around them, they must speak up and do what is necessary to change things.”

  1. Work session: choral reading of Act II of Julius Caesar (with a twist)
    1. Divide Act II into sections
    2. Small groups/pairs of students will be responsible for performing each section of text.
    3. Each group will be given a “style/tone” card that indicates a specific manner in which to perform the lines (cowboy, astronaut, sassy teen, rapper, etc.)
    4. Groups will rehearse their lines and perform the scene: the audience will try to guess what style/tone card each group received.
  2. Closer—How does emotion and inflection positively or negatively impact an audience’s understanding of the play?
October 21

AP Literature October 24-28

WEEK 12

Monday, October 24

1.      Review Othello Acts IV-V; compare/contrast film director’s choices with original script.

2.      Summarize scenes from Act IV-V

3.      Complete word search and Iago’s bestiary; create infographic to illustrate your findings

*Homework:  Group meeting Fri.

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Tuesday, October 25

1.      Warm-up: Creative Writing Tuesday: write a short poem, using one of Shakespeare’s lines from Act IV, Scene 2 or 3.

2.      Respond to the film analysis prompt for the Othello test.

*Homework:  Group meeting Fri. 

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

 

Wednesday, October 26

1.      Assess Othello

*Homework: Group meeting Fri.

Learning goal(s): Analyze a range of writing, noting strategies to apply to improve your own.

 

Thursday, October 27

1.      Warm-up: Revisit initial thesis statements.

2.      Media Center: Explore available literary criticism on your research/museum novel; formulate a topic and working thesis statement and identify three potential secondary sources for your paper.

*Homework:  Group meeting Fri.

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Friday, October 28

1.      Collaborate with research groups to clarify reading and plan museums.

2.      Death of a Salesman; alpha-box for American Dream; perform The Sandbox. 

3.      Review Theatre of the Absurd; view and analyze clips from Absurd plays; brainstorm absurd aspects of current society.

4.      Assign absurd plays; create and rehearse absurd plays to perform Friday.

*Homework:  Absurd plays due Friday.              

Learning Goal(s): Understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.

October 14

Honors World Literature October 17-21

Sun. 10/16—Membean practice due.

Wed. 10/19—PSAT Day

 

Honors World Literature                                             October 17-21       

Planning Your Week:

 

Sun. 10/16—Membean practice due.

Wed. 10/19—PSAT Day

 

Monday, October 17–Substitute

LG: Compare film adaptations to primary sources, analyzing directors’ choices and the effects they have on an audience’s interpretation of theme.

  1. Opener: Revisit Friday’s list of evidence; anticipate additional comparisons with Disney’s
  2. View scenes from Mulan: Rise of a Warrior and Disney’s Mulan, analyzing what is emphasized and what is absent from the film treatment of Mulan.
  3. Closer—organize your evidence from the texts and films to support analysis.

Tuesday, October 18

LG: Examine a seminal U.S. document for its historical and literary significance, analyzing style and structure for rhetorical effectiveness.

  1. Opener— PSAT skill practice – Examine the informational graphics from the Freedom of the Press Report 2015. Consider both the written text and the information presented in the graphics to answer synthesis questions. (Pearson, My Perspectives)
  2. Student-led Work Session— Read Source D, an excerpt from “Writing Chinese American into Words and Images: Storytelling and Retelling of The Song of Mu Lan.Review sources A, B, C, and then respond to the following prompt: How do authors use source materials (legends, myths, religious texts, historical figures, etc.) to reflect cultural and/or societal values?
  3. Read the preamble to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Observe some rhetorical strategies and cite text evidence to reflect on their effectiveness. (HMH – Collections, Close Reader)
  4. Closer – Create and share claim statements in response to the following prompt: “Why do you think the Preamble from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is considered a seminal document?”

Wednesday, October 19

PSAT Day – only 3rd and 4th periods will meet.

 

Thursday, October 20

LG: Understand authors’ rhetorical strategies in nonfiction works, focusing on how stories are adapted for different mediums and purposes.  

  1. Opener—IAN Brainstorm: What makes for an effective persuasive speech?
  2. Student Work Session—Read Malala Yousafazi’s speech at the United Nations. Identify and cite examples of anecdotes, proverbs, and historical examples in her text. In the graphic organizer, explain the intended effect on the audience for each of these rhetorical examples. (Pearson, My Perspectives)
  3. Adverbial Clause review – identify the adverbial clause, and subordinating conjunction, then describe the clause’s function in three model sentences from Yousafazi’s speech.
  4. View Diane Sawyer’s interview with Malala Yousafazi (under 7 minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ev-jPT5M9cU). Learn the media vocabulary lead-in, close-up shot, and slant, then answer the “Media Vocabulary” questions provided.
  5. Analyze the texts (speech and interview) for “mirror details.” Complete chart to compare how details are presented in the two different texts.
  6. CloserIAN: Answer the following question: (a) Which facts or other information appear in both the speech and the interview but are presented differently? (b) How do you account for those differences? Consider the medium of each text—one a written text, and one a work of broadcast journalism.

Friday, October 21

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—IAN: Add Unit 3 Table of Contents and SMELL graphic organizer for analyzing rhetoric to your IAN.
  2. Read (whole class) Marc Antony’s monologue from Act 3, Scene 2 of Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (lines 1-35 on the handout). Analyze the rhetorical impact of the speech by completing SMELL graphic organizer. (Springboard)
  3. Student-Led Work Session— Students choose between passage 2, 3, or 4 to complete SMELL analysis independently on a second monologue.
  4. Closer—IAN: Share examples of impactful language with the class. How do these diction choices affect tone?
October 14

AP Literature October 17-21

WEEK 11

Monday, October 17 (Substitute)

  1. Warm-up: MCM Full exam
  2. Read/analyze Act III with the study gude.

*Homework: Group meeting Fri.

 

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Tuesday, October 18

1.      Warm-up: Creative Writing Tuesday—expand the metaphor of jealousy as a green-eyed monster

2.      Present Ira Alrdige, Paul Robeson, and Other Othello Productions

3.      Read & analyze 3.4 (Lesson 18: “Ocular Proof”).

4.      Review Act III; evaluate the director’s choices in the Fishburne adaptation.

5.      Analyze the politics of casting of Othello (Lesson 18: “The Moor Is Far More Fair than Black”) and the gender issues (Lesson 19                   “There’s Magic in the Web”). 

*Homework: Group meeting Fri.

 

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Wednesday, October 19 PSAT/Senior Summit

1.      Warm-up: FRQ—research rough draft; write a prompt based on your thesis statement, then compose a response

2.      Read Act IV, Scene 1; discuss “The Slap” & Othello’s fall Lesson 20 “Is This the Noble Moor?”

3.      On Your Feet reading of Act IV, Scene 2; performance of Willow Scene (Act IV, Scene 3) Lesson 21 “O These Men, These Men!”; write a short poem, using one of Shakespeare’s lines from Act IV, Scene 2 or 3

4.      Select two volunteers to read Act IV, Scene 3

*Homework: Group meeting Fri.

 

Learning goal(s): Analyze a range of writing, noting strategies to apply to improve your own.

 

Thursday, October 20

1.      Warm-up: Theme Thursday—share green-eyed monsters

2.      Assign green-eyed monsters; analyze Iago’s & Emilia’s comments about jealousy and create an artistic rendition of the abstract                       concept.

3.      Assign final casting call for Act V.Lesson 22 “Murder’s Out of Time”

4.      Final conclusions Lesson 25 “Here Is My Journey’s End”

5.      Review Othello Acts IV-V

6.      Review word search and Iago’s bestiary for Othello test; create infographic to illustrate your findings.

*Homework:  Othello test Wed.; Group meeting Fri.

 

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

.

Friday, October 21

1.      Warm-up: Brain teaser Friday logic problems

2.      Collaborate with research groups to clarify reading and plan museums.

3.     Research secondary sources to support thesis statements.

*Homework:  Othello test Wed.; group meeting Fri.

 

Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text.

October 7

Honors World Literature Oct. 10-14

Honors World Literature                                             October 10-14       

 

Planning Your Week:

Sun. 10/9—Membean vocabulary practice due.

Tues. 10/11—The Joy Luck Club Socratic discussion (annotated article due along with 10 questions for the discussion; you should also prepare your book and print your scholar’s journal).

 

 

Monday, October 10

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. Opener—IAN: Construct a theme statement about The Joy Luck Club.
  2. Participate in the mini-fish bowl discussion.
    • You will unite with a second Chinese family to form a group of 8-12 members.
    • Four members will participate at a time.
    • The remaining group members will watch and take notes over the discussion.
    • For 10-15 minute rotations, the fishbowl group will conduct a conversation in the style of a mah jong game.
    • The person in the east chair will ask a question to begin.
    • The participant in the south chair will respond to the question.
    • Once the answer has been given by the student in the south chair, any further discussion can be followed by the participant in the west chair and then the north chair.
    • After the question is successfully completed for the first question, the east chair participant will ask the next question. Discussion will follow through the same path as before until all participants have asked and answered questions.
  3. Student-led work session: finalize Socratic seminar deliverables
    • Finish perfecting questions
    • Outline anticipated responses
    • Polish annotations on scholarly article
    • Prepare guide sheet
  4. Closer—exit ticket—answer in writing one of the questions discussed in today’ fishbowls.

 

Tuesday, October 11

LG: Collaborate effectively in peer discussion.

  1. Opener—Gather materials for the discussion and position yourself to evaluate a speaker.
  2. Discuss The Joy Luck Club in Socratic seminar groups
  3. Closing—Reflect on your own performance in the discussion and extend your thinking. Students who have not discussed yet will plan their responses for tomorrow’s discussion.

 

Wednesday, October 12

LG: Collaborate effectively in peer discussion.

  1. Opener—Gather materials for the discussion and position yourself to evaluate a speaker.
  2. Discuss The Joy Luck Club in Socratic seminar groups
  3. Scholar’s Celebration of The Joy Luck Club
  4. Closing—Reflect on your own performance in the discussion and extend your thinking.

 

Thursday, October 13

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. 

  1. Opener—PSAT Writing Practice
  2. Read “The Ballad of Mulan” and excerpts from Maxine Hong Kingston’s Woman Warrior, analyzing the character of Mulan and the thematic elements of each text.
  3. Compare/contrast the representations of Chinese culture in both texts.
  4. View scenes from Mulan: Rise of a Warrior, analyzing what is emphasized and what is absent from the film treatment of Mulan.
  5. Closer—list evidence from the film to support analysis of comparison/contrast to the texts we have read.

 

Friday, October 14

LG: Compare film adaptations to primary sources, analyzing directors’ choices and the effects they have on an audience’s interpretation of theme.

  1. Opener—revisit yesterday’s list of evidence; anticipate additional comparisons with Disney’s
  2. View scenes from Disney’s Mulan, analyzing what is emphasized and what is absent from the film treatment of Mulan.
  3. Closer—organize your evidence from both films to support analysis of comparison/contrast to the texts we have read.
October 7

AP Literature October 10-14

Week 10

PLANNING YOUR WEEK

Sun., Oct. 9– Complete Membean vocabulary practice.

Wed., Oct. 12– Final draft of FRQ (hawk & dog) due to Turnitin.com by 11:59 p.m.

Fri., Oct. 14– Group meeting; bring 3 articles for research papers

Monday, October 10

1. Warm-up: MCM Prose

2. Review subtext and analysis requirements for the Act II Scene 3 assessment.

3. Analyze & rehearse Act II Scene 3 “The Drinking Scene”

*Homework:  Revised FRQ (hawk & dog) due Wednesday; read research novelsgroup meeting Friday.

 Learning goal(s): Create an engaging, interactive presentation to present your findings to the class and apply a range of themes found in Othello.

Tuesday, October 11

1. Warm-up: Rehearse and make final adjustments to Act II Scene 3

2. Rehearse and perform Act II Scene 3 “The Drinking Scene”

3. Ticket-out-the-door: Evaluate each group’s performance; identify strengths and highlight key points in the scene.

*Homework:  Revised FRQ (hawk & dog) due Wednesday; read research novels—group meeting Friday.

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

Wednesday, October 12

1.      Warm-up: Review highlights from last week’s FRQ (strong intros, smooth lead-ins and transitions, apt and specific evidence); introduce research paper assignment. 

2.      Begin researching critical viewpoints on research novels; compose a working thesis statement.

*Homework:  Continue researching critical articles for research novels; group meeting Friday.

Learning goal(s): Analyze your timed writing and plan revisions to strengthen it. 

Thursday, October 13

1.      Review Othello Acts I & II

2.      Compare/contrast film techniques with literary techniques; discuss eliminating Act I.

3.      Read and analyze 3.1-2; begin 3.3 and prepare for the “Temptation Scene Relay.”

*Homework:  Continue researching critical articles for research novels; group meeting Friday.  

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

Friday, October 14

1. Warm-up: Fun Friday

2. Collaborate with research groups to clarify reading and plan museums.

3. Perform the “Temptation Scene” 

*Homework: 

Learning goal(s): Use the nonverbal, performance-related aspects of a script to influence the audience’s perception of theme.

October 4

Honors World Literature October 3-7

 

Honors World Literature                                             October 3-7       

 

Planning Your Week:

Mon. 10/3—The Joy Luck Club Scholars’ Journal entries (15 entries from 10 chapters) if you did not participate in early turn-in.

Sun. 10/9–Membean vocabulary practice due.

 

Monday, October 3

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they create meaning/tone. ELAGSE9-10RL7: Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” with Brueghel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment).

 

  1. IAN: PSAT skills review: what have we learned so far? How can we apply it to PSAT multiple choice questions? Complete sample critical reading passage.
  2. With your Chinese family, discuss the following question: The Garden of Marriage—Tan uses garden and weed imagery to show the condition of Ted and Rose’s marriage in “Without Wood.” Even Mr. Chou is incorporated into the image pattern. Trace the images through Rose’s story and decide what each images represents and how it fits into the pattern. Consider what the former condition of the garden shows about Ted; what the present condition reveals about Rose; what the imagery suggests about the future of their marriage. Explain how hulihuda connects to the imagery. What is the significance of Rose’s final dream? Her name?
  3. Using butcher paper, create a group response that answers the questions about “Without Wood”, provide text evidence to justify your group’s thinking. You may also add symbolic illustrations to enhance your response.
  4. Closer—How does the text structure employ parallel elements? What impact does this grammatical and stylistic feature have on the reader?

 

*Homework: Bring a copy of your literary analysis Part II responses for peer editing.

 

Tuesday, October 4

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. ELAGSE9-10RL2: Determine a theme and/or central idea of text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. ELAGSE9-10RL3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop theme.

 

  1. IAN: PSAT skills review—parallelism
  2. In your groups, read over the rubric for the responses. Decide what elements must be included in a top response. Peer review the responses among your Chinese family, making suggestions for content and style improvements. Consider such aspects as parallelism, sentence boundaries, coordination of complex ideas, etc.
  3. Meet with the teacher for writing conferences individually for specific concerns.

 

*Homework: Even in short responses, writer’s need to employ strong verbs, vivid text details with appropriate lead-ins, citations, and rich, stylistically strong commentary. Use this as a chance to improve your final response without a late penalty. Final responses will be due tomorrow.

 

 

Wednesday, October 5

LG: Research to deepen understanding of a topic depicted in a literary work, gathering evidence to use in scholarly discussions. ELAGSE9-10W7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. ELAGSE9-10W8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. ELAGSE9-10W9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 

  1. IAN: PSAT skills review (membean words and modifiers to create beauty/clarity)
  2. Complete researching an article to complement your scholars’ journal; annotate and prepare questions/comments to use in the Socratic discussion next week. In your article, find and label a modifier we’ve covered or a membean word and note its impact on meaning.
  3. Complete bibliography entries for Works Cited page

 

*Homework:

 

Thursday, October 6

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. ELAGSE9-10RL2: Determine a theme and/or central idea of text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. ELAGSE9-10RL3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop theme.

 

  1. Opener–IAN: An-mei’s mother tells her about the turtle that eats tears and knows a person’s misery. The tears produce magpies, birds of joy. She says, “Your tears do not wash away your sorrows. They feed someone else’s joy. And that is why you must learn to swallow your own tears.” Pick from one of the following women in the novel to explain how they “swallow their tears”: Suyuan, Taitai, An-mei, Lindo, Ying-ying, Lena, Rose, or Waverly.
  2. Pick your two favorite chapters of JLC and construct practice questions for a mini-fishbowl discussion in your group. 2 openers, 5 interpretive, and 3 evaluative level questions per chapter.

 

Friday, October 7

LG: Understand author’s rhetorical strategies in literary works, focusing on word choices and how they develop character and create meaning/theme. ELAGSE9-10RL2: Determine a theme and/or central idea of text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. ELAGSE9-10RL3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop theme.

  1. Opener—IAN: Construct a theme statement about the Joy Luck Club.
  2. Participate in the mini-fish bowl discussion.
    1. You will unite with a second Chinese family to form a group of 8-12 members.
    2. Four members will participate at a time.
    3. The remaining group members will watch and take notes over the discussion.
    4. For 10-15 minute rotations, the fishbowl group will conduct a conversation in the style of a mah jong game.
    5. The person in the east chair will ask a question to begin.
    6. The participant in the south chair will respond to the question.
    7. Once the answer has been given by the student in the south chair, any further discussion can be followed by the participant in the west chair and then the north chair.
    8. After the question is successfully completed for the first question, the east chair participant will ask the next question. Discussion will follow through the same path as before until all participants have asked and answered questions.
  3. Closer—exit ticket—answer in writing one of the questions discussed in today’ fishbowls.