November 23

AP Literature November 28-December 2

WEEK 16

Wednesday, November 30–Heart of Darkness Book 1 Quiz (questions/quotes due)

Sunday, December 4–Membean vocabulary practice due

 

Monday, November 28

  1. Review introduction to Heart of Darkness.
  2. Read/analyze HOD, answering questions and identifying significant quotes.

*Homework: HOD Book 1 quiz Wednesday (questions and quotes due).

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Tuesday, November 29

  1. Warm-up: View Death of a Salesman opening scenes; review exposition elements (character, setting, conflict).
  2. Continue analyzing Death of a Salesman Act One, focusing on image trace and guided reading question.

*Homework:  HOD Book 1 quiz Wednesday (questions and quotes due).

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

 

Wednesday, November 30

  1. Warm –up: HOD Book 1 Quiz.
  2. Read/analyze HOD Book 2, answering questions and identifying significant quotes.

*Homework:  HOD Book 2 quiz Wed. Dec. 7.

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

 

Thursday, December 1

  1. Warm –up: Review opening scene of Death of a Salesman.
  2. Read/analyze DOAS Act I, completing guided reading questions and image trace.

*Homework:  HOD Book 2 quiz Wed. Dec. 7.

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Friday, December 2

  1. Read/analyze HOD Book 2, answering questions and identifying significant quotes.
  2. Compare/contrast film adaption with the script.
  3. Assign film director projects.

*Homework:  HOD Book 2 quiz Wed. Dec. 7.

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

November 23

Honors World Literature November 28-December 2

Honors World Literature                      

 

Planning Your Week: November 28-December 2

Sun. 12/4—Membean practice due

 

Monday, November 28

LG: Understand political, geographical, and cultural features of Tibet that shape and influence its literary texts.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: What do you know about the Himalaya and Tibet? Brainstorm questions for research about this region and people.
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • Use ipads and research materials to explore the geographical, political, and cultural features of the Himalayas and Tibet (https://www.lonelyplanet.com/nepal)
    • Fill in maps and discuss the Chinese occupation; analyze the flags and symbols associated with China & Tibet.
    • Choose your topic: create your own flag, plan a trip to the Himalayas, or research the Yeti.
  3. Closer-Read the excerpt from Siddhartha and brainstorm teachings that can help the suffering of mankind (both little problems and major events like death).

Tuesday, November 29

LG: Understand religious features of Tibet that shape and influence its literary texts.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: The Buddha’s teachings say that attachment is the cause of our suffering, because nothing lasts; everything (including us) is impermanent. Things change, fall apart, dissolve, decay; people change, grow old, and die. We all know the suffering of loss, or the bittersweet of good times coming to an end. But is it possible to enjoy something for the moment that it is there and not wish for more? Have you ever enjoyed something, and when it was over you were satisfied to let it go? Conversely, have you ever got what you really wanted, and then not actually enjoyed it as much as you thought you would?
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • List the steps a physician takes when a patient comes seeking help; read the Four Noble Truths and connect to the steps a physician takes.
    • Examine the 8-Fold Path and brainstorm dos and don’ts for each.
  3. Closer-Review the excerpt from Siddhartha and identify what motivated him on his quest, what he wanted to avoid, and what he wanted to achieve.

Wednesday, November 30

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: Imagine you started following the 8-Fold Path of Buddhism. How would it change your daily life?
  2. View The Cup. Take note of examples of Western and/or modern life.
  3. Closer: Discuss your immediate reactions to the film.

Thursday, December 1

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account.

  1. Opener—Review the basic plot diagram and brainstorm plot events from The Cup.
  2. Student work session:
    • Create event strips for major plot events; sequence them and group exposition, rising action, climax, falling action/denouement, and resolution/conclusion, adjusting the diagram to fit the story.
    • Fill in graphic organizer for character actions and motivations; revisit the Four Noble Truths and analyze their motivations according to Buddhist principles.
  3. Closer—Identify thematic topics for The Cup and write a theme statement; Read the Frontline interview with Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys; respond based on your thematic connections to The Cup and your understanding of the culture and religion of Tibet.

Friday, December 2

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account and comparing with informational texts on similar topics.

  1. Opener—Play the greeting game then respond in your IAN: How did you feel when greeted by other groups? How did people from other groups react to your greeting? How does misunderstanding a person’s culture affect your reaction to them?
  2. Brainstorm a mind map/web for what comprises culture; review the cultural elements from The Cup.
  3. Student work session:
    • Complete the refugee handout “Packing to Go.”
    • Generate questions and research refugee populations in the world today.
    • Read/analyze the Dalai Lama’s speech to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights.
  4. Closer—Review your AP prompt essay and score from the Margaret Thatcher prompt; reflect on how you would approach the Dalai Lama’s speech if it were a prompt (consider the cultural context you now have as well as the rhetorical approaches in the speech itself).
November 11

Honors World Literature November 14-18

Honors World Literature                      

 

Planning Your Week: November 14-18

Mon. 11/14–Julius Caesar reading quiz (finish reading Act IV & V); No Fear Shakespeare

Sun. 11/20 and Sun. 11/27—Membean practice extra credit opportunity

 

Monday, November 14

LG: Understand plot, character development, and dramatic irony in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: Toward the end of the play, do you think Cassius would still say to Brutus, “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings”?
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • Reading quiz on Acts IV & V
    • View film version of Acts IV and V of Julius Caesar
    • Small group discussion questions
    • Work time on Caesar choice board projects
  3. Closer-in your opinion, who is the real hero of Julius Caesar?

*Homework: Students should continue to work on JC Choice Board and practice Membean

 

Tuesday, November 15

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Finish movie and small group discussion leftovers as needed.
  2. Lab time to complete Caesar choice board projects
  3. Membean practice in the lab if projects are complete

*Homework: Students should continue to work on JC Choice Board and practice Membean.

 

Wednesday, November 16

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Lab time to complete Caesar choice board projects
  2. Membean practice in the lab if projects are complete

 

Thursday, Nov. 17

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—Review the rubric for AP Lang FRQs
  2. Student work session: students will compose an in-class essay response to an AP Lang FRQ focused on rhetorical analysis.
  3. Closer—students will peer assess the essential elements of a successful FRQ

 

Friday, Nov. 18

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—return to the rubric for AP essays; view concrete language and descriptors of the specific score qualifications
  2. Student work session:
    • In Roman empires, round robin read the College Board released anchor papers.
    • Score each student essay using the rubric to justify the numerical values assigned to each paper. Be able to note how the writer was successful and convincing versus how the writer was merely adequate or perhaps entirely unsuccessful.
    • Compete a class calibration chart on the projector or white board
    • Students will then score their own essay and one peer essay using the AP rubric to justify their scores.
  3. Closer—What are the traits of the high scoring essays? (Whole group discussion) What improvements must I make to my own essays to be ready for AP Lang? (Individual reflection)
November 4

Honors World Literature November 7-11

Honors World Literature                                            

 

Planning Your Week: November 7-11

Sun. 11/6—Membean practice due.

Thurs. 11/17—Julius Caesar choice board due

 

Monday, November 7

LG: Analyze a film director’s interpretation of Julius Caesar focusing on character and theme.

  1. Opener—Review vocabulary from Act I, II, and III.
  2. View Julius Caesar, analyzing the film director’s choices (camera angles, choice of actors, set, costumes, sound effects, music, etc.) and evaluating the effectiveness of this interpretation.

*Homework: Continue to work on JC Choice Board.

 

Tuesday, November 8—Student Holiday/Election Day

 

Wednesday, November 9

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.  

  1. Opener: watch a scene from Law and Order https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjG2AMYiyrg where the lawyers deliver closing arguments from a murder. Critique the persuasive and rhetorical moves each lawyer makes.
  2. Review Act III of Julius Caesar, considering the question of whether the conspirators are justified in killing Caesar.
  3. Analyze evidence supporting and refuting the conspirators’ actions. For example, consider the following:
    • Caesar’s physical limitations (I ii 95-131)
    • Why should Caesar be king? (I.ii. 135-141)
    • The fate of Marullus and Flavius (I.ii. 281-287)
    • Brutus’s reasons for killing Caesar (I.i. 10-34)
    • Caesar refuses the crown (I. ii. 220-246)
    • Caesar’s will (III.ii. 240-244 and 249-254)
  4. Teams will compile text evidence in the style of persuasive “closing argument remarks” and vote if Caesar should be assassinated based on the evidence up to Caesar’s speech 3.1.58-73.
  5. Closer—Defend your vote in a short response and summarize Caesar’s good and bad qualities according to the text thus far.

 

Thursday, November 10

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—IAN Ponder and Respond: React to the statement “if people do not like what is happening around them, they must speak up and do what is necessary to change things.”
  2. Work session: choral reading of Act IV of Julius Caesar (with a twist)
    1. Divide Act IV into sections
    2. Small groups/pairs of students will be responsible for performing each section of text.
    3. Each group will be given a “style/tone” card that indicates a specific manner in which to perform the lines (cowboy, astronaut, sassy teen, rapper, etc.)
    4. Groups will rehearse their lines and perform the scene: the audience will try to guess what style/tone card each group received.
  3. Closer—How does emotion and inflection positively or negatively impact an audience’s understanding of the play?

 

Friday, November 11

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—students will read the LA Times article on Brasil and Congress’ open letter the Secretary of State John Kerry to assess the rhetorical strategies employed
    1. http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-brazil-impeachment-20160725-snap-story.html
    2. https://conyers.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/40-house-democrats-urge-secretary-kerry-call-democracy-brazil
  2. Lab—Work on Julius Caesar choice board due next Thursday, 11/17.

 

November 4

AP Literature November 7-11

WEEKS 14—15

DUE DATES: Wed., Nov. 16–Research paper final draft due.

Monday, November 7

  1. Review museum roles (materials handler needs to clean up folder and Schoology; recorders need to assist materials handler in cleaning up folder and Schoology and begin work on annotated bibliography; directors need to be checking in, maintaining momentum & community, heading off any problems now, and helping where you’re needed; reading coaches should shift to quote finders—theoretically, you’re the expert on the text, so located thematic connections, style passages, and author quotes; display designers need to look at all the ideas and plan a big picture display with cohesive thematic elements; multimedia designers need to get started building a webpage, ppt, Prezi, etc. or acquiring apps and digital components); collaborate with groups to solidify this plan; mini-Socratic seminars to share research articles and thesis statements.
  2. Perform absurd plays.
  3. Ticket-out-the-door: American Dream Alphabox

*Homework:  Choose a chapter from How to Read Literature Like a Professor that relate to your literary analysis thesis and explain connections, citing quotes from the novel to support your connections (post to Schoology).

Learning goal(s): Develop collaboration with peers to deepen analysis and extension of a text; understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.

 

Tuesday, November 8—Student Holiday/Election Day

Wednesday, November 9—Wednesday, November 16

  1. Present museum research projects.

*Homework: Research paper final draft due Wednesday, Nov. 16.

Learning Goal(s): Create an engaging, interactive presentation to present your findings to the class.

 

Thursday, November 17

  1. Warm-up: Review absurdity and how it manifests itself in current literature/film.
  2. Finish performing absurd plays.
  3. Introduce Heart of Darkness; begin reading Book 1, answering questions & identifying quotes.

*Homework: Read Heart of Darkness Book 1 by Wednesday, November 30; finish quotes & questions to prepare for a reading quiz.

Learning Goal(s): Understand essential elements of theatre of the absurd and apply them to your own social commentary.

 

Friday, November 18

  1. Warm –up: Ponder Death of a Salesman pre-reading questions; group therapy.
  2. Read/analyze Death of a Salesman Act One, focusing on image trace and guided reading questions.

*Homework:  Read Heart of Darkness Book 1 by Wednesday, November 30; finish quotes & questions to prepare for a reading quiz.

Learning goal(s): Draw conclusions about symbols and themes by analyzing textual evidence.

 

Thanksgiving Break!!! Enjoy!!!!