November 11

Honors World Literature November 14-18

Honors World Literature                      

 

Planning Your Week: November 14-18

Mon. 11/14–Julius Caesar reading quiz (finish reading Act IV & V); No Fear Shakespeare

Sun. 11/20 and Sun. 11/27—Membean practice extra credit opportunity

 

Monday, November 14

LG: Understand plot, character development, and dramatic irony in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: Toward the end of the play, do you think Cassius would still say to Brutus, “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings”?
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • Reading quiz on Acts IV & V
    • View film version of Acts IV and V of Julius Caesar
    • Small group discussion questions
    • Work time on Caesar choice board projects
  3. Closer-in your opinion, who is the real hero of Julius Caesar?

*Homework: Students should continue to work on JC Choice Board and practice Membean

 

Tuesday, November 15

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Finish movie and small group discussion leftovers as needed.
  2. Lab time to complete Caesar choice board projects
  3. Membean practice in the lab if projects are complete

*Homework: Students should continue to work on JC Choice Board and practice Membean.

 

Wednesday, November 16

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Lab time to complete Caesar choice board projects
  2. Membean practice in the lab if projects are complete

 

Thursday, Nov. 17

LG: Consider the rhetorical strategies speakers employ and evaluate their effectiveness on intended audience.

  1. Opener—Review the rubric for AP Lang FRQs
  2. Student work session: students will compose an in-class essay response to an AP Lang FRQ focused on rhetorical analysis.
  3. Closer—students will peer assess the essential elements of a successful FRQ

 

Friday, Nov. 18

LG: Review methods of characterization and analyze character in Julius Caesar.

  1. Opener—return to the rubric for AP essays; view concrete language and descriptors of the specific score qualifications
  2. Student work session:
    • In Roman empires, round robin read the College Board released anchor papers.
    • Score each student essay using the rubric to justify the numerical values assigned to each paper. Be able to note how the writer was successful and convincing versus how the writer was merely adequate or perhaps entirely unsuccessful.
    • Compete a class calibration chart on the projector or white board
    • Students will then score their own essay and one peer essay using the AP rubric to justify their scores.
  3. Closer—What are the traits of the high scoring essays? (Whole group discussion) What improvements must I make to my own essays to be ready for AP Lang? (Individual reflection)


Posted November 11, 2016 by Rachael Sanford in category Honors World Literature

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