November 23

Honors World Literature November 28-December 2

Honors World Literature                      

 

Planning Your Week: November 28-December 2

Sun. 12/4—Membean practice due

 

Monday, November 28

LG: Understand political, geographical, and cultural features of Tibet that shape and influence its literary texts.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: What do you know about the Himalaya and Tibet? Brainstorm questions for research about this region and people.
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • Use ipads and research materials to explore the geographical, political, and cultural features of the Himalayas and Tibet (https://www.lonelyplanet.com/nepal)
    • Fill in maps and discuss the Chinese occupation; analyze the flags and symbols associated with China & Tibet.
    • Choose your topic: create your own flag, plan a trip to the Himalayas, or research the Yeti.
  3. Closer-Read the excerpt from Siddhartha and brainstorm teachings that can help the suffering of mankind (both little problems and major events like death).

Tuesday, November 29

LG: Understand religious features of Tibet that shape and influence its literary texts.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: The Buddha’s teachings say that attachment is the cause of our suffering, because nothing lasts; everything (including us) is impermanent. Things change, fall apart, dissolve, decay; people change, grow old, and die. We all know the suffering of loss, or the bittersweet of good times coming to an end. But is it possible to enjoy something for the moment that it is there and not wish for more? Have you ever enjoyed something, and when it was over you were satisfied to let it go? Conversely, have you ever got what you really wanted, and then not actually enjoyed it as much as you thought you would?
  2. Student-Led Work Session—
    • List the steps a physician takes when a patient comes seeking help; read the Four Noble Truths and connect to the steps a physician takes.
    • Examine the 8-Fold Path and brainstorm dos and don’ts for each.
  3. Closer-Review the excerpt from Siddhartha and identify what motivated him on his quest, what he wanted to avoid, and what he wanted to achieve.

Wednesday, November 30

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account.

  1. Opener: IAN ponder and respond: Imagine you started following the 8-Fold Path of Buddhism. How would it change your daily life?
  2. View The Cup. Take note of examples of Western and/or modern life.
  3. Closer: Discuss your immediate reactions to the film.

Thursday, December 1

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account.

  1. Opener—Review the basic plot diagram and brainstorm plot events from The Cup.
  2. Student work session:
    • Create event strips for major plot events; sequence them and group exposition, rising action, climax, falling action/denouement, and resolution/conclusion, adjusting the diagram to fit the story.
    • Fill in graphic organizer for character actions and motivations; revisit the Four Noble Truths and analyze their motivations according to Buddhist principles.
  3. Closer—Identify thematic topics for The Cup and write a theme statement; Read the Frontline interview with Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys; respond based on your thematic connections to The Cup and your understanding of the culture and religion of Tibet.

Friday, December 2

LG: Analyze cultural elements depicted in film, focusing on what is emphasized in this account and comparing with informational texts on similar topics.

  1. Opener—Play the greeting game then respond in your IAN: How did you feel when greeted by other groups? How did people from other groups react to your greeting? How does misunderstanding a person’s culture affect your reaction to them?
  2. Brainstorm a mind map/web for what comprises culture; review the cultural elements from The Cup.
  3. Student work session:
    • Complete the refugee handout “Packing to Go.”
    • Generate questions and research refugee populations in the world today.
    • Read/analyze the Dalai Lama’s speech to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights.
  4. Closer—Review your AP prompt essay and score from the Margaret Thatcher prompt; reflect on how you would approach the Dalai Lama’s speech if it were a prompt (consider the cultural context you now have as well as the rhetorical approaches in the speech itself).


Posted November 23, 2016 by Rachael Sanford in category Honors World Literature

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