November 3

AP Literature Week 14 November 6 – 10

Week 14

Planning Your Week

F 11/10–Last group meeting for EPCOT presentations, which begin Monday, 11/13.

 

Monday, 11/6

Opener: Review FRQ approaches (thematic organization).

Work Session:

  1. Compose a response to the FRQ for Hamlet (Polonius to Laertes and Ophelia).

Closer: Peer score/edit FRQ responses.

Learning Goal(s): Trace theme throughout a text; analyze an author’s style; produces writing with stylistic maturity.

 

Tuesday, 11/7 — No school due to the student holiday.

 

 

Wednesday, 11/8

Opener: Finish viewing Hamlet; discuss comparisons of Kenneth Brannagh’s performance in Othello and Hamlet and contrasts of directors’ stylistic choices.

Work Session: 

  1. Analyze visual elements in still shots from the film.
  2. Compare the text to the film shots, focusing on the way directors create visual representations of motifs.

Closer: View Mel Gibson as Hamlet, comparing/contrasting the “To Be or Not To Be” speech.

Learning Goal(s): Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist).

 

Thursday, 11/9

Opener: Review FRQ approaches (literary elements tied to theme; comparative writing).

Work Session:

  1. Compose a response to the FRQ for comparison of Iago’s soliloquy vs. Hamlet soliloquy.

Closer: Peer score/edit FRQ responses.

Learning Goal(s): Trace theme throughout a text; analyze an author’s style; produces writing with stylistic maturity.

 

Friday, 11/10

Opener: Group meeting for last minute issues before next week’s presentations; create a “to do list” for EPCOT presentations, which start Monday.

Work Session:

  1. Discuss Rosencrantz and Guildenstern as characters (STEAL).
  2. Introduce Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead as allusion and element of 20th century absurdity.

Closer: Read/analyze opening scene from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

Learning Goal(s): Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist).


Posted November 3, 2017 by Rachael Sanford in category AP Literature

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*