2017-2018 School Year

Welcome to the 2017-2018 School Year! My name is Dr. Stella Etta, and I am an ESL teacher here at East Cobb Middle School. This is my 17th year teaching in Cobb County and my third year here at East Cobb Middle.

 I am originally from Nigeria, but  moved here in 1999 from the Middle East where I lived for about 5 years. Before that, I lived and went to school in the United Kingdom where I obtained a Masters Degree. I also have an M.A. in Applied Linguistics and ESL from Georgia State University, and a Doctorate from Argosy University, Atlanta. I have four sons who have all graduated from college.

I am very excited about this new school year with a lot of adventures to look forward to. I wish you a very successful learning experience with us here at East Cobb Middle School, where we educate with POSITIVITY !

Please see below to download the English Language Proficiency Standards, as well as Our syllabus with my other contact information.

IEL Social Studies Curriculum-2hsd70l

gr6-social-studies-standards

The 5 English Language Proficiency Levels

 gr7-social-studies-standards

crct-terms

2017-pacing-guide

gr6-social-studies-standards

social-studies-standards-155d8vp

2017-pacing-guide

Thank you, and I wish you a positively Successful School Year!

Helping English Language Learners Succeed!

Who is the ELL?

  • Any student whose first language is not English, but the main language of instruction is English.
  • May be born in the United States but has lived in a non-English speaking environment.
  • May or may not be able to communicate in English.
  • May be fluent in English, but still struggles academically, due to Limited English Proficiency (LEP)
  • Does not necessarily have a learning disability.
  • Students are tested and placed in the Intensive English Program (IEL) or the ESOL program according to their W APT scores.
  • All eligible students must take the annual ACCESS test to determine continued eligibility or Exit from the program.
  • All Exited students are monitored for two years (ELL-M)

The vision of the CCSD ESOL Program is to ensure that “all English Language Learners receive the respect, encouragement and opportunities they need to build the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be successful, contributing members of a global society.”

The mission of the CCSD ESOL Program is to” develop the English proficiency of students while advancing their academic achievement, and to support them in becoming productive, contributing citizens in the United States and an ever-changing global society.”

The Goals are to:

  • Value and build upon students’ academic, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds.
  • Create a supportive learning environment.
  • Assist students in reaching their full academic potential.
  • Build connections between ESOL and school wide instructional programs.
  • Encourage participation of students and their families within the school and the community.
  • Foster understanding and appreciation of diverse populations within the school and the community.

(http://www.cobbk12.org/centraloffice/alternativeeducation/esol/)

==================================================================

Tips to help ELLs succeed in Class:

  • Listen and Follow the teacher’s directions.
  • Stay focused and Pay attention to what is going on in the classroom.
  • Take note of what is on the board: the Standards, the Opening, Work Session and Closing as well as the Homework Sections
  • Participate in class: answer questions, ask questions, and take notes.
  • Take notes to help you listen in class; you may also use drawings and illustrations.
  • Copy key vocabulary and write the definition or key words to associate with the vocabulary.
  • Study your vocabulary, use graphic organizers or index cards to help you.
  • Review your notes/handouts daily.
  • Complete all assignments and turn in.
  • Ask for extra time if you need it to complete assignments or finish quizzes or tests.

===================================================================

IDENTIFYING AND HELPING ELLS IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS

(http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2)

There are many different labels and terms that have been used to identify a student who is in the process of learning to listen, speak, read, and write in English. Some of the terms, such as LEP (Limited English Proficiency), focus on the negative and point to what a student cannot do.

Other terms, such as ESL (English as a Second Language), assume that the student is learning a second language, when, in fact, it could be the student’s third, fourth, or even fifth language. We have chosen, therefore, to refer to these students as ELL, because the mastery of the English language is the objective for these students.

However, we must understand the true meaning of language mastery. As students learn the English language, they must also be able to assimilate the culture, traditions, values and attitudes that are associated with English speakers. –

ELL students live in two separate worlds, at home and at school. Although many students move easily between them, other students find that their worlds are frequently in conflict with each other (Freeman and Freeman, 2001). In their homes, ELL students are surrounded by their native culture, language, and traditions, and often the atmosphere that they encounter in school is completely alien to them.

They are unprepared for what they experience there, and they are often confused about activities and routines that are new to them — routines that we, as educators, might take for granted. We must be extremely observant, as each ELL student’s success or failure in the “new world” of school depends on several variables:

  • Does the student have teachers and other staff members in the school who are sensitive and supportive?
  • Does the teacher work with the ELL student instead of doing the task for him? Are the other students taught to be accepting of the ELL student?
  • Do the staff and students at school value the culture(s) of the ELL student?
  • Do the parents of the ELL student support the education that is being offered to their child? Are the parents literate in their native language? How is the English language and culture valued at home?
  • Does the ELL student feel safe enough to take language and cultural risks at school? When the ELL student does take a risk in the classroom, is the effort validated and applauded? Is the teacher using a model of comprehensive literacy in the classroom for all students?
  • Does the teacher have high, but realistic, expectations of the ELL student?
  • Do authentic assessment measures truly pinpoint the growth of the ELL student as well as the areas of great need?

See more at: http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2

=======================================================================================

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES/TIPS FOR ELLS IN MAINSTREAM CLASSROOMS

Modification Tips and Techniques for ESL Students (http://www.scsk12.org/scs/subject-areas/esl/pdfs/hurleys-esl-modifications.pdf)

Instruction Tip: ESL students need modified instruction to learn both English and content.

Modifying instruction is critical to ESL students’ success. However, modifying instruction doesn’t mean creating a second lesson plan or curriculum; it just means changing some of the ways you do things. Most of your native English-speaking students can benefit from modifications as well.

Technique: Use various teaching styles and tricks of the trade.

  • Encourage students to participate in class
  • Have high expectations of your students
  • Give students more wait time: at least 15-20 seconds Assign students a bilingual or English-speaking study buddy
  • Use cooperative learning and put students in groups with Englishlearners
  • Use lots of visuals, like graphic organizers and pictures
  • Use physical activity: model, role-play, act out.
  • Repeat and rephrase often Emphasize the 5-8 most important vocabulary words of a lesson Focus on the 2-3 key concepts of a lesson
  • Give students an outline of the lesson that highlights the key concepts Let ESL students copy your or someone else’s notes
  • Write in print unless specifically teaching the manuscript alphabet Give simple instructions
  • Use concrete language and questions Simplify complex questions
  • Use children’s literature/lower grade level materials to teach content Incorporate the 4 skills of language acquisition: reading/writing/listening/speaking
  • Check understanding using “show me” techniques Class/Homework Tip: ESL students experience greater success when class-work and homework is modified to fit their capabilities.

Modifying Class-work or Homework tasks to fit ESL students’ capabilities doesn’t mean expecting less from them. It means giving them realistic tasks to complete that increase their chances for success. Technique: Allow for flexibility in the tasks you assign. Reduce assignments Simplify complex tasks Give ESL students extra time to do work or complete projects Adapt the task to the students’ skill levels Ignore spelling or grammar errors except for when explicitly taught Allow students to take breaks when working: their brains tire quickly!

Assessment Modifications Tip: Assess ESL students according to what they can do rather than what they cannot do.

Standardized tests or even teacher-created tests can’t always measure ESL students’ progress accurately or authentically. Instead, measure ESL students by what they can do at any point in time, keeping in mind what they could not do earlier. Have they shown progress? Have they sincerely made an effort to learn? Have they demonstrated their learning?

Technique: Modify the tests you give. ™ Test key concepts or main ideas ™ Avoid test questions asking for discrete information.

Below are More Websites:

http://www.csun.edu/science/ref/language/teaching-ell.html

http://www.eslpartyland.com/teaching-esl-student

https://www.polk-fl.net/staff/resources/documents/ESOLInstructionalStrategies.pdf

=================================================================================================================================

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING PLATFORM/ON-LINE VIDEOS

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?default=1

https://www.teachingchannel.org/

 

Middle School SCIENCE Matters!

MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE CURRICULUM

6th  Grade EARTH SCIENCE 
Unit 1: Rocks and Minerals
Unit 2: Weathering and Erosion    
Unit 3: Inside The Earth
Unit 4: Water in the Earth’s Process 
Unit 5: Climate and Weather
Unit 6: Universe and Solar System
Unit 7: Earth, Moon and Sun
Unit 8: Human Impact
MILESTONES  REVIEW← We are Here 
======================================================================================================
 7th Grade LIFE SCIENCE with Dr. Jones-Wilson and Mr. Dennis Smith during Period 2 http://www.cobblearning.net/sjwilson3/

7th Grade with Mr. Gilley during Period 5 http://www.cobblearning.net/geoffreygillie/

Unit 1: Ecology

Unit 2: Energy Flow and Nutrient Cycling

Unit 3: Structure and Functions of Cells 

Unit 4: Organization of Life       

Unit 5: Biological Traits and Heredity 

Unit 6: Evidence of Evolution 

MILESTONES  REVIEW← We are Here                 

 =============================================================================================

8th Grade PHYSICAL SCIENCE with Ms. Mercer and Mr. Barrow during Period 3 http://www.cobblearning.net/mercer/

Unit 1: The Nature of Matter

Unit 2: Forces and Motion

Unit 3:  Energy In our Life 

Unit 4: Electricity and Magnetism

Unit 5: Light and Sound Show

MILESTONES  REVIEW← We are Here 

======================================================================================================

Tips to help you be successful in your Science Class:

  • Listen and Follow the teacher’s directions.
  • Stay focused and Pay attention to what is going on in the classroom.
  • Take note of what is on the board: the Standards, the Opening, Work Session and Closing as well as the Homework Sections
  • Participate in class: answer questions, ask questions, and take notes.
  • Take notes to help you listen in class; you may also use drawings and illustrations.
  • Copy key vocabulary and write the definition or key words to associate with the vocabulary.
  • Study your vocabulary, use graphic organizers or index cards to help you.
  • Review your notes/handouts daily.
  • Complete all assignments and turn in.
  • Ask for extra time if you need it to complete assignments or finish quizzes or tests.

======================================================================================================

IDENTIFYING AND HELPING ELLS IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS

(http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2)

There are many different labels and terms that have been used to identify a student who is in the process of learning to listen, speak, read, and write in English. Some of the terms, such as LEP (Limited English Proficiency), focus on the negative and point to what a student cannot do.

Other terms, such as ESL (English as a Second Language), assume that the student is learning a second language, when, in fact, it could be the student’s third, fourth, or even fifth language. We have chosen, therefore, to refer to these students as ELL, because the mastery of the English language is the objective for these students.

However, we must understand the true meaning of language mastery. As students learn the English language, they must also be able to assimilate the culture, traditions, values and attitudes that are associated with English speakers. –

ELL students live in two separate worlds, at home and at school. Although many students move easily between them, other students find that their worlds are frequently in conflict with each other (Freeman and Freeman, 2001). In their homes, ELL students are surrounded by their native culture, language, and traditions, and often the atmosphere that they encounter in school is completely alien to them.

They are unprepared for what they experience there, and they are often confused about activities and routines that are new to them — routines that we, as educators, might take for granted. We must be extremely observant, as each ELL student’s success or failure in the “new world” of school depends on several variables:

  • Does the student have teachers and other staff members in the school who are sensitive and supportive?
  • Does the teacher work with the ELL student instead of doing the task for him? Are the other students taught to be accepting of the ELL student?
  • Do the staff and students at school value the culture(s) of the ELL student?
  • Do the parents of the ELL student support the education that is being offered to their child? Are the parents literate in their native language? How is the English language and culture valued at home?
  • Does the ELL student feel safe enough to take language and cultural risks at school? When the ELL student does take a risk in the classroom, is the effort validated and applauded? Is the teacher using a model of comprehensive literacy in the classroom for all students?
  • Does the teacher have high, but realistic, expectations of the ELL student?
  • Do authentic assessment measures truly pinpoint the growth of the ELL student as well as the areas of great need?

See more at: http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2

=============================================================================

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES/TIPS FOR ELLS IN MAINSTREAM CLASSROOMS

Modification Tips and Techniques for ESL Students (http://www.scsk12.org/scs/subject-areas/esl/pdfs/hurleys-esl-modifications.pdf)

Instruction Tip: ESL students need modified instruction to learn both English and content.

Modifying instruction is critical to ESL students’ success. However, modifying instruction doesn’t mean creating a second lesson plan or curriculum; it just means changing some of the ways you do things. Most of your native English-speaking students can benefit from modifications as well.

Technique: Use various teaching styles and tricks of the trade.

  • Encourage students to participate in class
  • Have high expectations of your students
  • Give students more wait time: at least 15-20 seconds Assign students a bilingual or English-speaking study buddy
  • Use cooperative learning and put students in groups with Englishlearners                                                                                                                Use lots of visuals, like graphic organizers and pictures
  • Use physical activity: model, role-play, act out.
  • Repeat and rephrase often Emphasize the 5-8 most important vocabulary words of a lesson Focus on the 2-3 key concepts of a lesson
  • Give students an outline of the lesson that highlights the key concepts Let ESL students copy your or someone else’s notes
  • Write in print unless specifically teaching the manuscript alphabet Give simple instructions
  • Use concrete language and questions Simplify complex questions
  • Use children’s literature/lower grade level materials to teach content Incorporate the 4 skills of language acquisition: reading/writing/listening/speaking
  • Check understanding using “show me” techniques Class/Homework Tip: ESL students experience greater success when class-work and homework is modified to fit their capabilities.

Modifying Class-work or Homework tasks to fit ESL students’ capabilities doesn’t mean expecting less from them. It means giving them realistic tasks to complete that increase their chances for success. Technique: Allow for flexibility in the tasks you assign. Reduce assignments Simplify complex tasks Give ESL students extra time to do work or complete projects Adapt the task to the students’ skill levels Ignore spelling or grammar errors except for when explicitly taught Allow students to take breaks when working: their brains tire quickly!

Assessment Modifications Tip: Assess ESL students according to what they can do rather than what they cannot do.

Standardized tests or even teacher-created tests can’t always measure ESL students’ progress accurately or authentically. Instead, measure ESL students by what they can do at any point in time, keeping in mind what they could not do earlier. Have they shown progress? Have they sincerely made an effort to learn? Have they demonstrated their learning?

Technique: Modify the tests you give. ™ Test key concepts or main ideas ™ Avoid test questions asking for discrete information.

Below are More Websites:

http://www.csun.edu/science/ref/language/teaching-ell.html

http://www.eslpartyland.com/teaching-esl-student

https://www.polk-fl.net/staff/resources/documents/ESOLInstructionalStrategies.pdf

==========================================================================

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING PLATFORM/ON-LINE VIDEOS

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?default=1

https://www.teachingchannel.org/

 

Weekly Updates

Who is the ELL?

  • Any student whose first language is not English, but the main language of instruction is English.
  • May be born in the United States but has lived in a non-English speaking environment.
  • May or may not be able to communicate in English.
  • May be fluent in English, but still struggles academically, due to Limited English Proficiency (LEP)
  • Does not necessarily have a learning disability.
  • Students are tested and placed in the Intensive English Program (IEL) or the ESOL program according to their W APT scores.
  • All eligible students must take the annual ACCESS test to determine continued eligibility or Exit from the program.
  • All Exited students are monitored for two years (ELL-M)

The vision of the CCSD ESOL Program is to ensure that “all English Language Learners receive the respect, encouragement and opportunities they need to build the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be successful, contributing members of a global society.”

The mission of the CCSD ESOL Program is to” develop the English proficiency of students while advancing their academic achievement, and to support them in becoming productive, contributing citizens in the United States and an ever-changing global society.”

The Goals are to:

  • Value and build upon students’ academic, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds.
  • Create a supportive learning environment.
  • Assist students in reaching their full academic potential.
  • Build connections between ESOL and school wide instructional programs.
  • Encourage participation of students and their families within the school and the community.
  • Foster understanding and appreciation of diverse populations within the school and the community.

(http://www.cobbk12.org/centraloffice/alternativeeducation/esol/)

==================================================================

Tips to help ELLs succeed in Class:

  • Listen and Follow the teacher’s directions.
  • Stay focused and Pay attention to what is going on in the classroom.
  • Take note of what is on the board: the Standards, the Opening, Work Session and Closing as well as the Homework Sections
  • Participate in class: answer questions, ask questions, and take notes.
  • Take notes to help you listen in class; you may also use drawings and illustrations.
  • Copy key vocabulary and write the definition or key words to associate with the vocabulary.
  • Study your vocabulary, use graphic organizers or index cards to help you.
  • Review your notes/handouts daily.
  • Complete all assignments and turn in.
  • Ask for extra time if you need it to complete assignments or finish quizzes or tests.

===================================================================

IDENTIFYING AND HELPING ELLS IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS

(http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2)

There are many different labels and terms that have been used to identify a student who is in the process of learning to listen, speak, read, and write in English. Some of the terms, such as LEP (Limited English Proficiency), focus on the negative and point to what a student cannot do.

Other terms, such as ESL (English as a Second Language), assume that the student is learning a second language, when, in fact, it could be the student’s third, fourth, or even fifth language. We have chosen, therefore, to refer to these students as ELL, because the mastery of the English language is the objective for these students.

However, we must understand the true meaning of language mastery. As students learn the English language, they must also be able to assimilate the culture, traditions, values and attitudes that are associated with English speakers. –

ELL students live in two separate worlds, at home and at school. Although many students move easily between them, other students find that their worlds are frequently in conflict with each other (Freeman and Freeman, 2001). In their homes, ELL students are surrounded by their native culture, language, and traditions, and often the atmosphere that they encounter in school is completely alien to them.

They are unprepared for what they experience there, and they are often confused about activities and routines that are new to them — routines that we, as educators, might take for granted. We must be extremely observant, as each ELL student’s success or failure in the “new world” of school depends on several variables:

  • Does the student have teachers and other staff members in the school who are sensitive and supportive?
  • Does the teacher work with the ELL student instead of doing the task for him? Are the other students taught to be accepting of the ELL student?
  • Do the staff and students at school value the culture(s) of the ELL student?
  • Do the parents of the ELL student support the education that is being offered to their child? Are the parents literate in their native language? How is the English language and culture valued at home?
  • Does the ELL student feel safe enough to take language and cultural risks at school? When the ELL student does take a risk in the classroom, is the effort validated and applauded? Is the teacher using a model of comprehensive literacy in the classroom for all students?
  • Does the teacher have high, but realistic, expectations of the ELL student?
  • Do authentic assessment measures truly pinpoint the growth of the ELL student as well as the areas of great need?

See more at: http://www.benchmarkeducation.com/best-practices-library/supporting-english-language-learners-in-reading-writing.html#section_2

=======================================================================================

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES/TIPS FOR ELLS IN MAINSTREAM CLASSROOMS

Modification Tips and Techniques for ESL Students (http://www.scsk12.org/scs/subject-areas/esl/pdfs/hurleys-esl-modifications.pdf)

Instruction Tip: ESL students need modified instruction to learn both English and content.

Modifying instruction is critical to ESL students’ success. However, modifying instruction doesn’t mean creating a second lesson plan or curriculum; it just means changing some of the ways you do things. Most of your native English-speaking students can benefit from modifications as well.

Technique: Use various teaching styles and tricks of the trade.

  • Encourage students to participate in class
  • Have high expectations of your students
  • Give students more wait time: at least 15-20 seconds Assign students a bilingual or English-speaking study buddy
  • Use cooperative learning and put students in groups with Englishlearners
  • Use lots of visuals, like graphic organizers and pictures
  • Use physical activity: model, role-play, act out.
  • Repeat and rephrase often Emphasize the 5-8 most important vocabulary words of a lesson Focus on the 2-3 key concepts of a lesson
  • Give students an outline of the lesson that highlights the key concepts Let ESL students copy your or someone else’s notes
  • Write in print unless specifically teaching the manuscript alphabet Give simple instructions
  • Use concrete language and questions Simplify complex questions
  • Use children’s literature/lower grade level materials to teach content Incorporate the 4 skills of language acquisition: reading/writing/listening/speaking
  • Check understanding using “show me” techniques Class/Homework Tip: ESL students experience greater success when class-work and homework is modified to fit their capabilities.

Modifying Class-work or Homework tasks to fit ESL students’ capabilities doesn’t mean expecting less from them. It means giving them realistic tasks to complete that increase their chances for success. Technique: Allow for flexibility in the tasks you assign. Reduce assignments Simplify complex tasks Give ESL students extra time to do work or complete projects Adapt the task to the students’ skill levels Ignore spelling or grammar errors except for when explicitly taught Allow students to take breaks when working: their brains tire quickly!

Assessment Modifications Tip: Assess ESL students according to what they can do rather than what they cannot do.

Standardized tests or even teacher-created tests can’t always measure ESL students’ progress accurately or authentically. Instead, measure ESL students by what they can do at any point in time, keeping in mind what they could not do earlier. Have they shown progress? Have they sincerely made an effort to learn? Have they demonstrated their learning?

Technique: Modify the tests you give. ™ Test key concepts or main ideas ™ Avoid test questions asking for discrete information.

Below are More Websites:

http://www.csun.edu/science/ref/language/teaching-ell.html

http://www.eslpartyland.com/teaching-esl-student

https://www.polk-fl.net/staff/resources/documents/ESOLInstructionalStrategies.pdf

=================================================================================================================================

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING PLATFORM/ON-LINE VIDEOS

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?default=1

https://www.teachingchannel.org/